eyespot

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eye·spot

(ī'spot),
1. A colored spot or plastid (chromatophore) in a unicellular organism.
2. Synonym(s): ocellus (1)

eyespot

(ī′spŏt′)
n.
1. A light-sensitive organelle of certain chiefly unicellular organisms, such as euglenas and some motile algae.
2. A simple visual organ of certain invertebrates, consisting of a cluster of photoreceptor cells and pigment cells.
References in periodicals archive ?
To examine the mechanisms that give rise to eyespot effects, we designed a randomized experiment imbedded in an online survey about politics.
Thompson 1976; Bonar 1978) as eyespots in the hatching larvae of two common planktotrophic species.
Considering how crucial this partnership is, it may be that roving zooxanthellae use their eyespots to scope out the most desirable digs-a possibility "we think it is quite interesting," Koike said.
Troglochernes differs from all other chernetid genera by the following combination of characters: flagellum with 4 blades, or possibly 3 blades in one species; spermathecae with 2 thickened and slightly curved tubes fused basally; legs without tactile setae; carapace unicolored and with two transverse furrows; eyes or eyespots absent; vestitural setae generally small, dentate and clavate.
Embryos that were creamy white with eyespots, hatching spine, and distinct abdominal segmentation, were assumed viable.
Ovigerous females collected from the West Branch of the Grand Calumet River and from Illinois, Lake County, Dead River mouth in Illinois Beach State Park included females with 1st instar and ova with eyespots on the verge of eclosion (Table 1).
The moths are easily identified because of their size and the characteristic "nine-shaped" eyespots on the forewings.
Students use marshmallows as stamps for printing eyespots on the feathers in repeated patterns above and behind the bird's body.
The Luna moth is a light-green moth with four wings - all with distinctive eyespots.
The caterpillars may resemble bird droppings or have fake eyespots behind their heads.
In addition, rudimentary eyespots on the tips of the arms' upper surfaces can detect changes in light.