asthenopia

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asthenopia

 [as″thĕ-no´pe-ah]
weakness or easy fatigue of the eye, with pain in the eyes, headache, and dimness of vision. adj., adj asthenop´ic.
accommodative asthenopia asthenopia due to strain of the ciliary muscle.
muscular asthenopia asthenopia due to weakness of the external ocular muscles.

as·the·no·pi·a

(as'thĕ-nō'pē-ă),
Subjective symptoms of ocular fatigue, discomfort, lacrimation, and headaches arising from use of the eyes.
Synonym(s): eyestrain
[G. astheneia, weakness, + ōps, eye]

asthenopia

(ăs′thə-nō′pē-ə)
n.
Weakness or fatigue of the eyes, usually accompanied by headache and dimming of vision.

as′the·nop′ic (-nŏp′ĭk) adj.

as·the·no·pi·a

(as'thĕ-nō'pē-ă)
Subjective symptoms of ocular fatigue, discomfort, lacrimation, and headaches arising from use of the eyes.
Synonym(s): eyestrain.
[G. astheneia, weakness, + ōps, eye]

asthenopia

‘eyestrain’, headaches or visual difficulty attributed to misuse of the eyes. A vague and, in the absence of refractive error, often imaginary entity. The term is not now generally used by ophthalmologists. See also ACCOMMODATIVE ASTHENOPIA.

asthenopia 

Term used to describe any symptoms associated with the use of the eyes. The causes of asthenopia are numerous: sustained near vision, either when the accommodation amplitude is low or hypermetropia is uncorrected (accommodative asthenopia), aniseikonia (aniseikonic a.), astigmatism (astigmatic a.), pain in the eye (asthenopia dolens), heterophoria (heterophoric a.), ocular inflammation (asthenopia irritans), hysteria (nervous a.), uncorrected presbyopia (presbyopic a.), improper illumination (photogenous a.) or retinal disease (retinal a.). Syn. eyestrain; near point stress (NPS) (although this term is restricted to any symptoms arising from near vision). See convergence excess; convergence insufficiency; divergence insufficiency; visual fatigue; ocular headache.
References in periodicals archive ?
He advises, looking away from the screen from time to time will reduce eye fatigue.
87% OF RADIOLOGISTS EXPERIENCE PHYSICAL DISCOMFORT WHEN READING IMAGES 66% experience eye fatigue 56% suffer from neck strain 52% struggle with back pain
Eyestrain was the most prevalent reported ocular symptom (62%) in our study, followed by eye fatigue (43%), irritating and burning eyes (39%), blurred vision (36%), dryness of eyes (27%) and redness of eyes (23%).
Vision health professionals are treating a growing number of people who work all day at computers for eye fatigue. This malady is known as computer vision syndrome, and there is a health care strategy to combat the problem called 20/20/20: every 20 minutes the computer user should take a break for at least 20 seconds and look at objects that are 20 feet away.
According to MarkeTech's study, no fewer than 87 percent of radiologists experience physical discomfort when reading images, ranging from eye fatigue to back pain.
The SoftBlue display technology reduces eye fatigue by eliminating emissions of blue light at harmful wavelengths.
* LMD adjusts illumination levels for reduced eye fatigue.
The yellow backing enhances scale readability and helps minimize eye fatigue. Specifications are as follows: accuracy: [+ or -]3% FS; connections: 3/8" female NPT; max temp: 150 F/ 65 C; and max pressure: 100 psi/6.89 bar.
Use plastic photochromic lenses that block 100 per cent UV radiation and enhance visual comfort by preventing eye fatigue and reducing glare.
dry eyes, watery eyes, irritated and burning eyes, eye strain, eye fatigue, headache, blurred vision and double vision) and posture-related symptoms (e.g.
To avoid eye fatigue, follow the Vision Council's "20-20-20" rule: Every 20 minutes, take a 20-second break and look at something 20 feet away from your monitor.
We blink less when we're doing intense work and some of the eye fatigue can be due to dry eye that we might not even notice.