extremophile

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extremophile

(ĭk-strē′mə-fīl′)
n.
Any of various organisms that require extreme conditions of temperature, pressure, or chemical concentration, as in very cold or salty environments, in order to thrive.

extremophile

(ĕks-trēm′ŏ-fīl) [L. extremus, outermost, + Gr. philein, to love]
An organism that can thrive in exceptionally adverse environments, such as in very cold or very hot, halogenated, or salty conditions.

extremophile

a MICROORGANISM that can grow under severe or extreme environmental conditions; for example, very high temperature, high NaCl concentration, very low pH. Often they are members of the ARCHAEA.
References in periodicals archive ?
The ability of extremophilic bacteria to thrive and live in extreme environments is strictly associated with their enzymes as well as biochemical pathways.
Although many detailed studies of insect AQPs have been performed, such work on extremophilic insects or other animals is limited.
Feller, "Xylanases, xylanase families and extremophilic xylanases," FEMS Microbiology Reviews, vol.
The Neanderthal origin would be related to massive extremophilic archaeal expansion which occurred in the ice age.
Extremophilic microorganisms (extremophiles) are adapted to thrive in such hostile environments.
Some topics covered include the microbial ecology of a natural extreme acidic environment, microbial succession during a heap bioleaching cycle of low-grade copper sulphides, geomicrobiology of sulfidic mine dumps, and microbial diversity and genetic response to stress conditions of extremophilic bacteria isolated from the Escondida copper mine.
It will help spread the word about the practical applications and environmental benefits that can come from extremophilic research.
Expression of 17/3-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases in mesophilic and extremophilic yeast.
Regardless of the source of hydrocarbons, the notion of extremophilic subsurface microorganisms is generally well accepted.
Researchers are pursuing recombinant expression because the growth conditions required by many extremophilic organisms are not readily amenable to large-scale culture.
They occur primarily in tropical to temperate marine habitats, though freshwater and extremophilic species are known.