maximum

(redirected from Extreme value)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

maximum

 [mak´sĭ-mum]
the greatest quantity, effect, or value possible or achieved under given circumstances. adj., adj max´imal.
transport maximum (tubular maximum) Tm , the highest rate in milligrams per minute at which the renal tubules can transfer a substance either from the tubular luminal fluid to the interstitial fluid or from the interstitial fluid to the tubular luminal fluid, beyond which it may be excreted in the urine. In kidney function tests, it is expressed as Tm with inferior letters representing the substance used in the test, such as TmPAH (transport maximum for p-aminohippuric acid).

max·i·mum

(mak'si-mŭm),
The greatest amount, value, or degree attained or attainable.
[L. neuter of maximus, greatest]

maximum

Managed care
See Lifetime maximum.
 
Vox populi
adjective Referring to the most or greatest amount of something.
 
noun The most or greatest possible amount of a thing.

max·i·mum

(mak'si-mŭm, -mal)
The greatest amount, value, or degree attained or attainable.
[L. neuter of maximus, greatest]
References in periodicals archive ?
The extreme value of the vertical load of the right landing gear is 1.5 times of the one of the left landing gear.
Finally, a new financial risk forecasting model based on the EVT-POT-SV-T-MN dynamic VaR model is established, which is combined with extreme value theory.
Energy portfolio risk management using time- varying extreme value copula methods Economic Modelling, 38, 470-485.
Vanem, "Non-stationary extreme value models to account for trends and shifts in the extreme wave climate due to climate change," Applied Ocean Research, vol.
(2006), "Using Extreme Value Theory to Measure Value at Risk for Daily Electricity Spot Prices", International Journal of Forecasting 22: 283-300.
Tikanmaki, "Discussion on "Plotting positions for fitting distributions and extreme value analysis"," Canadian Journal of Civil Engineering, vol.
The distribution of the tails of innovations is better modelled using the Extreme Value Theory or t-distribution instead of normal distribution.
(2007) and, FURIO & MENEU (2010), if a significant trend is detected in a meteorological data sample (composed by extreme values), the assumption that the probabilistic structure of this series does not change over the time may no longer be supported.
Cramer, (1946), Gumbel (1958), Pickands (1975)) developed Extreme Value Theory (2) that showed that in limit of large samples (n is large, exactly what we have in engineering where we have a very large number of load and strength values in each increment of time), and under a wide range of conditions, there are only a few models that are needed for describing the statistics of the largest and/or smallest value of a distribution.
The company said the new website offers a customised set of links for the needs of the Extreme Value Retail (EVR) channels it serves.

Full browser ?