paradigm shift

(redirected from Extraordinary science)
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Related to Extraordinary science: Scientific paradigm

paradigm shift

A decay or collapse in a paradigm that occurs when new data accumulate, and either partially invalidate the previously-accepted theory–paradigm, or are completely at odds with the paradigm. See Central dogma.
References in periodicals archive ?
Research conducted during a time of crisis by a prenormal science is what Kuhn referred to as "extraordinary science." Kuhn (1962) described many activities or what he called "symptoms of extraordinary science," and what is central are the continuous attempts by members of the emerging science to solve the anomalies that triggered the scientific crisis.
Seeing in the Dark is an inspirational look at ordinary people doing extraordinary science. S&S, 2002, 379 p., b&w illus., hardcover, $26.00.
it is normal science, in which Sir Karl's sort of testing does not occur, rather than extraordinary science which most nearly distinguishes science from other enterprises.
Matthew's entry shows just how exciting and extraordinary science and engineering can really be.
All of the finalists brought something different to the competition but their entries show just how exciting and extraordinary science and engineering can be."
Kuhn's account of the dynamic of scientific growth-paradigm --> normal science --> puzzle-solving --> anomaly --> crisis --> extraordinary science --> revolution --> normal science--became widely known as the last nail in the coffin of the positivist conception of science and the turning point in the subsequent demise of Popperianism.
Kuhn's account of the dynamic of scientific growth--paradigm [right arrow] normal science [right arrow] puzzle-solving [right arrow] anomaly [right arrow] crisis [right arrow] extraordinary science [right arrow] revolution [right arrow] normal science--became widely known as the last nail in the coffin of the positivist conception of science and the turning point in the subsequent demise of Popperianism.

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