external jugular vein

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Related to External jugular veins: vena jugularis

ex·ter·nal jug·u·lar vein

[TA]
superficial vein formed inferior to the parotid gland by the junction of the posterior auricular vein and the retromandibular vein, and passing down the side of the neck crossing to the sternocleidomastoid muscle vertically to empty into the subclavian vein.
Synonym(s): vena jugularis externa [TA]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
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external jugular vein

A vein that drains blood from the scalp and face; it arises from the merger of the posterior facial and posterior auricular veins behind the angle of the mandible. The external jugular vein runs superficially down the neck, crossing the sternocleidomastoid muscle, to drain into the subclavian vein. Tributaries of the external jugular vein include the posterior external jugular, transverse cervical, suprascapular, and anterior jugular veins.
See: illustrationand for illus.
See also: vein
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
Caption: Figure 1: Dissected body with the clavicles (RC and LC) in situ, right and left internal jugular vein (RIJV and LIJV), right and left external jugular vein (REJV and LEJV), right and left supraclavicular (RSC and LSC) branches of cephalic vein, right and left cephalic vein (RCV and LCV), right and left infraclavicular (RIC and LIC) branch of cephalic vein, right and left axillary veins (RAV and LAV), left brachiocephalic vein (LBC), superior vena cava (SVC), aorta (A), deltoid muscle (D), and pectoral major muscle (P).
It shows the right and left internal jugular vein (RIJV and LIJV), right and left external jugular vein (REJV and LEJV), right and left supraclavicular (RSC and LSC) branches of cephalic vein, right and left cephalic vein (RCV and LCV), right and left infraclavicular (RIC and LIC) branch of cephalic vein, right and left axillary veins (RAV and LAV), right and left brachiocephalic vein (RBC and LBC), superior vena cava (SVC), aorta (A), deltoid muscle (D), and pectoral major muscle (P).
Caption: Figure 3: Schematic diagram showing the clavicle (C), the internal jugular vein (IJV), external jugular vein (EJV), supraclavicular (SC) branches of cephalic vein, cephalic vein (CV), infraclavicular (IC) branches of cephalic vein, axillary veins (AV), brachiocephalic vein (BC), and superior vena cava (SVC).
DISCUSSION: The external jugular vein is one of the variable veins.
The external jugular vein may be absent or smaller than usual and if so the anterior or internal jugular vein is enlarged (2).
A case of duplication of external jugular vein in the middle third near the posterior border of sternocleidomastoid muscle has been reported (6).
Cornelius Rosse and Penelope Gaddum-Rosse (8) have mentioned that a smaller superficial external jugular vein usually connects with the upper part of the internal jugular vein.
Skandalakis (9) has mentioned that in its course, the external jugular vein communicates with the internal jugular vein and receives a number of tributaries in the neck.
The old proximal end of the primitive cephalic vein, which is the cranio dorsal part of the clavicular venous ring, may be recognised as a trunk of the adult external jugular vein. The part of the venous ring which is ventral and superficial to the clavicle i.e.
Neville (15), in the case of internal jugular vein ligation during radical neck dissection, collateral drainage develops through oblique jugular vein from facial vein into the external jugular vein.
The preferred sites for long term central venous access are the external jugular vein, internal jugular vein and subclavian vein.

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