ecstasy

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ecstasy

(eks'tă-sē), Avoid the misspellings ecstacy and exstasy.
1. The popular name for 304 methylenedioxymethamphetamine.
2. A drug of abuse, used at clubs, raves, and rock concerts. This agent was first synthesized in Germany in the early 1900s and used during World War I to induce soldiers to charge from the line of trenches into the line of fire. It acts acutely to increase energy, provide a sense of camaraderie and attachment, increase sexual desire, and induce euphoria. Besides sexual side effects, produces increased heart rate, chills, seating, dehyration, and various strictly psychiatric symptoms. Dosages not much higher than recreational amounts can be toxic to serotonergic and other neurons. Long-term use associated with changes in serotonergic neurons may predispose an abuser to long-term psychiatric symptoms.
3. Mental exaltation, and/or a rapturous experience.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

ecstasy

(ĕk′stə-sē)
n. pl. ecsta·sies
often Ecstasy Slang MDMA.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

ecstasy

Hug drug, love drug Substance abuse An oral designer analogue of amphetamine, a 'schedule I' controlled substance which may be fatal due to heat exhaustion and dehydration, combination with methadone, LSD, opiates–eg, heroin or Fentanyl, or anesthetics–eg, Ketamine; it is a popular 'recreational' drug of abuse, especially in a dance-party–see Rave–setting; at moderate doses, it causes euphoria, sense of well-being, enhanced mental or emotional clarity; at higher doses, hallucinations, sensations of lightness, depression, paranoid thinking, violent behavior Toxicity Serotonin neurotoxicity, sweating, dilated pupils, blurred vision, tachycardia, arrhythmias, fever, spasticity, hypotension, bronchospasm, acidosis, anorexia, N&V, HTN, faintness, chills, insomnia, convulsions, loss of voluntary muscle control, anxiety, or paranoia. See Designer drugs, 'Ice. ', Rave party. Cf Eve.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

ec·sta·sy

(ek'stă-sē)
A drug of abuse used especially at clubs and raves; increases energy, heightens sexual urges, and induces euphoria. Even small recreational dosage can lead to hazardous reactions.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

ecstasy

A popular name for the drug 3,4-methylene dioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), a hallucinogenic amphetamine with effects that are a combination of those of LSD and amphetamine (amfetamine). Ecstasy is widely used to promote an appropriate state of mind at ‘rave’ all-night dance session, but the combination of strenuous physical exercise and the direct toxic effect of the drug has led to a number of deaths in young people. Such death result from an uncontrolled rise in body temperature (hyperthermia), kidney failure, muscle breakdown (rhabdomyolysis) and sometimes liver failure. Urgent measures to reduce body core temperature can save life. The drug can also precipitate a persistent paranoid PSYCHOSIS. Claims that ecstasy can damage the dopamine system of the brain and cause Parkinson's disease have been discredited.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

ec·sta·sy

(ek'stă-sē)
A drug of abuse, used at clubs, raves, and rock concerts.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
A partir de 42 DAT, exceto para 'Extasy', que demonstrou ser um pouco mais tardio, esta proporcao aumentou notavelmente, coincidindo com o periodo em que houve um aumento acelerado do IAF (Figura 2A).
'Tis Extasy with Wisdom joyn'd, And Heaven infus'd into the Mind.
(6) One of the dangers of the sublime is precisely this causal logic: that "extasy" and "breathlessness" involved in the experience of the mountains, the ravine, the Arve, the pines, and the glaciers can lead us to posit an anthropomorphized force as the only possible source of our experience.
Publisher Tina Haveman, CEO of eXtasy Books and Divine Destinies is giving away a Kindle Fire during the company's three-month tour.
Wilson "no sooner saw the Mark, than abandoning himself to the most extravagant Rapture of Passion, he embraced Joseph, with inexpressible Extasy, and cried out in Tears of Joy, I have discovered my Son, I have him again in my Arms" (339).
"Nature," writes Wollstonecraft, "is the nurse of sentiment," and "the harmonised soul sinks into melancholy, or rises to extasy, just as the chords are touched" ...
Two pages after the above-quoted passage, which reveals the precariousness of Sensibility as a psycho-social and cultural position, she finds harbor in organic nature as a source, not only of the beautiful and sublime, but first of all, of "sentiment." The vocabulary of Sensibility glides clearly into that of Romanticism: Nature is the nurse of sentiment,--the true source of taste;--yet what misery, as well as rapture, is produced by a quick perception of the beautiful and sublime, when it is exercised in observing animated nature, when every beauteous feeling and emotion excites responsive sympathy, and the harmonized soul sinks into melancholy, or rises to extasy, just as the chords are touched, like the aeolian harp agitated by the changing wind.