ecstasy

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ecstasy

(eks'tă-sē), Avoid the misspellings ecstacy and exstasy.
1. The popular name for 304 methylenedioxymethamphetamine.
2. A drug of abuse, used at clubs, raves, and rock concerts. This agent was first synthesized in Germany in the early 1900s and used during World War I to induce soldiers to charge from the line of trenches into the line of fire. It acts acutely to increase energy, provide a sense of camaraderie and attachment, increase sexual desire, and induce euphoria. Besides sexual side effects, produces increased heart rate, chills, seating, dehyration, and various strictly psychiatric symptoms. Dosages not much higher than recreational amounts can be toxic to serotonergic and other neurons. Long-term use associated with changes in serotonergic neurons may predispose an abuser to long-term psychiatric symptoms.
3. Mental exaltation, and/or a rapturous experience.

ecstasy

(ĕk′stə-sē)
n. pl. ecsta·sies
often Ecstasy Slang MDMA.

ecstasy

Hug drug, love drug Substance abuse An oral designer analogue of amphetamine, a 'schedule I' controlled substance which may be fatal due to heat exhaustion and dehydration, combination with methadone, LSD, opiates–eg, heroin or Fentanyl, or anesthetics–eg, Ketamine; it is a popular 'recreational' drug of abuse, especially in a dance-party–see Rave–setting; at moderate doses, it causes euphoria, sense of well-being, enhanced mental or emotional clarity; at higher doses, hallucinations, sensations of lightness, depression, paranoid thinking, violent behavior Toxicity Serotonin neurotoxicity, sweating, dilated pupils, blurred vision, tachycardia, arrhythmias, fever, spasticity, hypotension, bronchospasm, acidosis, anorexia, N&V, HTN, faintness, chills, insomnia, convulsions, loss of voluntary muscle control, anxiety, or paranoia. See Designer drugs, 'Ice. ', Rave party. Cf Eve.

ec·sta·sy

(ek'stă-sē)
A drug of abuse used especially at clubs and raves; increases energy, heightens sexual urges, and induces euphoria. Even small recreational dosage can lead to hazardous reactions.

ecstasy

A popular name for the drug 3,4-methylene dioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), a hallucinogenic amphetamine with effects that are a combination of those of LSD and amphetamine (amfetamine). Ecstasy is widely used to promote an appropriate state of mind at ‘rave’ all-night dance session, but the combination of strenuous physical exercise and the direct toxic effect of the drug has led to a number of deaths in young people. Such death result from an uncontrolled rise in body temperature (hyperthermia), kidney failure, muscle breakdown (rhabdomyolysis) and sometimes liver failure. Urgent measures to reduce body core temperature can save life. The drug can also precipitate a persistent paranoid PSYCHOSIS. Claims that ecstasy can damage the dopamine system of the brain and cause Parkinson's disease have been discredited.

ec·sta·sy

(ek'stă-sē)
A drug of abuse, used at clubs, raves, and rock concerts.
References in periodicals archive ?
The same letter contains another passage charged with the vocabulary of Sensibility while at the same time displaying some of the basic tropes of Romantic literature and the Enlightenment concern for humanity pervading the whole work: Some recollections, attached to the idea of home, mingled with reflections respecting the state of society I had been contemplating that evening, made a tear drop on the rosy cheek I had just kissed; and emotions that trembled on the brink of extacy and agony gave a poignancy to my sensations, which made me feel more alive than usual.
Awhile with mute awe gazing I would brood, Then weep aloud in a wild extacy! (XXVIII.9-14) (40)
As the company harmonize together: Oh, such nights--such delights-- As these can never tire; They raptures, extacy, impart; Endless transports they inspire, `Till the soul is sweetly undone!-- This is Life this is Life in London!