bomb

(redirected from Explosive weapon)
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bomb

Computers
An abnormal termination of a program being executed, which requires that the computer be rebooted.
 
Drug slang
A regional street term for a large quantity of various drugs of abuse—e.g., crack, heroin, or a large marijuana cigarette.
 
Military noun
A device designed to cause physical damage to a specified area, by exploding on impact or when a particular event occurs—e.g., being moved, or on a timer.

verb To attack an opponent with (aerial) bombs.
 
Popular psychology
See Time bomb.

Radiation oncology
A container formerly used to store radioactive materials (e.g., radium) for future use in radiotherapy.

Vox populi
The significance of the word bomb may depend on whether the speaker uses the indefinite article—e.g., “a bomb”, which means that the subject matter is awful— or the definite article—e.g., “the bomb”, which means that the subject matter is cool, fashionable or exciting.

bomb

Military medicine A device designed to cause physical damage to a specified area, by exploding on impact or when a particular event occurs–eg, being moved. See B-61, Dirty bomb, Genetic bomb Popular psychology See Time bomb.

bomb

A radioactive source held in a container for the purpose of RADIOTHERAPY.
References in periodicals archive ?
During the UNSC debate on the Protection of Civilians this past May, the Government of Austria announced that it will host a multilateral conference on the protection of civilians from explosive weapons in urban contexts.
In that war-torn country, explosive weapons are also the cause of death in 84 percent of child conflict fatalities compared to 56 percent of civilian adult deaths.
The explosive weapons raising concerns when used in populated areas are those having wide-area effects.
He says representatives expressed concern that explosive weapons used in populated areas lead to deaths, injuries and traumas as well as destruction of infrastructure and critical services, while creating forced displacement.
Iain Overton, executive director of AOAV, said that since his organisation was established in 2011, they have found that when explosive weapons are used in towns and cities, 92 per cent of those killed or injured will be civilians.
Consequent to the indiscriminate use of force and explosives in cities, the flow of Syrian refugees has caused some to call for a complete ban on the use of explosive weapons in cities or urban areas.
UXOs are classified as explosive weapons and include bombs, bullets, shells, grenades and land mines that did not explode when they were deployed and therefore still pose a risk of detonation, potentially many decades after they were used or discarded.
It highlights once again the disproportionate risk for civilians when explosive weapons are used in urban areas, said O'Brien, also the UN Under-Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs.
O'Brien told the 15-member body that over the past ten-days, indiscriminate attacks and the use of explosive weapons in populated areas by Government forces and its allies, by non-State armed opposition groups, and by listed terrorist groups have "intensified affecting mostly innocent civilians." "We are dismayed that the Government of Syria did not approve our request for a cross-line inter-agency convoy to eastern Aleppo city in May," he added.
Roger Mullin, chairman of the House of Commons All Party Parliamentary Group on Explosive Weapons, said: "The demonstration event is designed to bring home to my political colleagues some of the horror that explosive weapons cause to innocent people and to those whose job it is to deal with the weapons and the aftermath of their use.
"If the fighting persists near schools, playgrounds, homes and clinics, and parties continue to use explosive weapons in those areas - particularly mortars and IED tactics, these appalling numbers of children killed and maimed will continue." she noted.
"The Houthis should stop firing heavy explosive weapons into populated areas of the city," he added.