introduced species

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introduced species

one that does not naturally occur in the area and has been brought in accidentally or intentionally by man, for example, rabbits in Australia (introduced originally to the British Isles from Spain).
References in periodicals archive ?
In addition to offering more exotic species and weathered looks, Mohawk Industries is introducing wider plank widths to its lineup of hardwood flooring, said Bob Weseman, vice president of hard surface flooring.
The planned aquaculture facility is good news for the Caspian's beluga sturgeon, whose population has been decimated over the past two decades by environmental degradation, the invasion of exotic species, and overfishing.
All remaining populations of the slickspot peppergrass are potentially vulnerable to naturally occurring events (such as wildfire), introductions of exotic species, development, and other human activities.
We conclude that these organizations should reconsider the use of technical packages that encourage introduction of exotic species. Instead, they should help the development of technologies that propose to cultivate native species with potential for aquaculture.
Conservation biology now recognizes exotic species as second only to habitat destruction in the loss of biodiversity because of their contribution to native species extinction.
Scientific Certification Systems (SCS), an FSC certifier, gave the company FSC's green star of approval even though its own findings describe many past and present problems, including overcutting of spruce and fir, planting exotic species, aggressive herbicide spraying and paying subpar wages.
"Since Europeans began settling the area we now call America, exotic species have flooded in, becoming so prevalent that many Americans can't say which plants and animals are native and which are not." (p.3) Many Americans don't think twice about the presence of a starling, a honeybee or a pheasant.
The worms that are inhabiting our forests are exotic species -- like zebra mussels and purple loosestrife.
The appearance of these seaweeds may be related to changing ocean conditions, but nevertheless represents a warning that other exotic species might be capable of establishing populations in changing Southern California waters.
A Floristic Quality Assessment (FQA) value was calculated and exotic species were noted.
The scientists found that exotic species were concentrated near urban edges in both the vegetation and the seed bank.
Exotic species are organisms transported by humans, wildlife, wind, and water into regions where they did not historically exist.