introduced species

(redirected from Exotic organism)

introduced species

one that does not naturally occur in the area and has been brought in accidentally or intentionally by man, for example, rabbits in Australia (introduced originally to the British Isles from Spain).
References in periodicals archive ?
Worst of all, the ironic practice of bringing in an exotic organism to control an exotic organism can backfire.
You have to consider the possible downside of introducing one exotic organism to control another," comments Mellon.
From the view of ecology and conservation biology, however, the potential ecological risks of this practice should be considered as the abalone shells could act as vectors of exotic organisms.
Recent research suggests that epigenetic changes are more determinant than genetic variability in the success of invasions: Jablonka and Raz (2009) indicate that adaptation can occur very rapidly, without genetic change, through the selection of epigenetic variants, especially when populations are small and lack genetic variability, as is the case in most bioinvasions (the expansion of exotic organisms into regions where it had not previously existed, often as a result of human activity).
Exotic organisms have a history of causing native surroundings to collapse.
Wood packaging materials (WPM) are known to be important potential vectors of exotic organisms, some of which turn into major ecological or socio-economic problems in regions where they are introduced.
In some places, seeping methane sustains thriving communities of exotic organisms that harness the gas as an energy source in their sunless environment.
Under such a system, some currently unregulated introductions of traditionally bred cultivars and exotic organisms considered to be of moderate or greater risk would likely become subject to regulatory review, whereas many gene-spliced organisms that now require case-by-case review would likely be regulated less stringently.
In planning our sharpshooter research and our other investigations of unwanted invasive or exotic organisms, we coordinate with the National Invasive Species Council.
The globalization of food markets and resulting increase in imports from developing nations highlight the need for improved methods for ensuring food safety, such as more sensitive laboratory techniques for identifying exotic organisms in food.
Another possible source of invasive species is aquaculture, which regularly imports exotic organisms.
ecosystems, President Carter's 1977 Executive Order 11987 on Exotic Organisms, was mainly ignored because it met with strong opposition from agriculture, the pet trade, and other interest groups.