exoteric

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ex·o·ter·ic

(ek'sō-ter'ik),
Of external origin; arising outside the organism.
[G. exōterikos, outer]

ex·o·ter·ic

(eks'ō-ter'ik)
Of external origin; arising outside the organism.
[G. exōterikos, outer]
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References in periodicals archive ?
Since man is a rational animal, the resistance to reason must itself be expressed in reasoning and rational terms--hence, the need for exotericism, for a rational doctrine that closes down excessive reasoning and brings it to a halt in dogma or belief.
For Strauss's critics, the argument over the exotericism thesis is difficult to merely circumvent.
This purpose is analogous to a feature of Strauss's exotericism first noted by Robert McShea:
(21.) As Baudrillard says, "What in Europe had remained a critical and religious esotericism became transformed on the New Continent into a pragmatic exotericism ...
This tendency was already present in latent form in his most famous work, De l'unite transcendante des religions (`Of the Transcendent Unity of Religions'),(27) where Schuon rebelled against the `invading autocracy' of all exotericisms.(28) Once they had returned to Islam his disciples `broke out again', in some way, immediately afterwards, although convinced that they still dwelt in the heart of that religion ...
In a discussion of Nietzsche's writing, Rosen discerns three reasons for exotericism: the philosopher dissembles (1) for the purposes of educating; (2) because of "the intrinsic hiddenness of the great thinker"; and (3) for a certain delight in toying with his inferiors.
The first part of chapter 2 discusses Strauss's apparent identification, in Philosophy and Law, of contemplation with the aim of divine law; the second part culminates in a discussion of Strauss's "Farabian turn" (and concomitant discovery of exotericism).