exoskeleton

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Related to Exoskeletons: apodeme

exoskeleton

 [ek″so-skel´ĕ-ton]
an external hard framework to the bodies of certain animals, derived from the ectoderm, such as a crustacean's shell; it supports and protects the soft tissues. In vertebrates the term is sometimes applied to structures produced by the epidermis, such as hair, nails, hoofs, and teeth.

ex·o·skel·e·ton

(ek'sō-skel'ĕ-tŏn),
1. Hard parts (for example, hair, teeth, nails, feathers, hooves, scales) developed from the epidermis in vertebrates. Synonym(s): dermoskeleton
2. Outer chitinous envelope of an insect, or the chitinous or calcareous covering of certain crustaceans and other invertebrates.

exoskeleton

/exo·skel·e·ton/ (-skel´ĕ-ton) a hard structure formed on the outside of the body, as a crustacean's shell; in vertebrates, applied to structures produced by the epidermis, as hair, nails, hoofs, teeth, etc.

exoskeleton

[ek′səskel′ətən]
Etymology: Gk, exo, outside, skeletos, dried up
the hard outer covering of many invertebrates, such as crustaceans, which lack the bony internal skeleton of vertebrates. Compare endoskeleton.
A powered suit of armour being developed for military and construction applications which will protect and augment its wearer’s strength

ex·o·skel·e·ton

(eks'ō-skel'ĕ-tŏn)
1. All hard parts (e.g., hair, teeth, nails, feathers, dermal plates, and scales), developed from the ectoderm or somatic mesoderm in vertebrates.
2. Outer chitinous envelope of insects, some crustaceous, and other invertebrates.

exoskeleton

a skeleton present on the outside of an organism as in ARTHROPODS or MOLLUSCS. Some vertebrates possess an exoskeleton in addition to an ENDOSKELETON, for example, armadillos and turtles. The exoskeleton may lie outside the EPIDERMIS, as in the arthropods, or inside, as in vertebrates such as scaly fish, tortoises, etc.

exoskeleton

an external hard framework, as a crustacean's shell, that supports and protects the soft tissues of lower animals, derived from the ectoderm. In vertebrates the term is sometimes applied to structures produced by the epidermis, as hair, claws, hoofs, teeth, etc.
References in periodicals archive ?
With the use of a wearable robotic exoskeleton, such as my device, we will be able to accurately perform physical therapy exercises concerning the fine movements of the hand such as pinching or grasping," he said.
Once you have decided to build your exoskeleton, you should decide which type you want.
Chen and his team also are exploring controlling the exoskeleton via a patient's electromyography (EMG) and EEG signals.
Wearing the exoskeleton it's easy to imagine one with arms built to specifically carry certain type of tools, maybe even with batteries for power tools instead of dead metal as the counterweight.
Fast forward to 2000, the Defence Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) kickstarted a number of human exoskeleton projects under the banner of "Exoskeletons for Human Performance Augmentation" project, with over $75million in funds.
Exoskeletons are capable of transferring the weight of heavy loads to the ground through powered legs without loss of human mobility.
Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has given clearance to market and sell the powered lower-limb exoskeleton created by a team of Vanderbilt University engineers and commercialized by the Parker Hannifin Corporation for both clinical and personal use in the United States.
Indeed, consensus at the NRI workshop on Clinical Brain-Neural Machine Interface Systems held at the Houston Methodist Research Institute in Spring 20131 showed that although neuroprostheses, neurally controlled exoskeletons, and other types of BMI systems have achieved success in a handful of investigative studies, translation of closed-loop neuroprosthetic devices from the laboratory to the market is challenged by gaps in the scientific data regarding long-term device reliability and safety, uncertainty in the regulatory market and reimbursement pathways, as well as patient-acceptance challenges that impede their fast and effective translation to the end user (Liew et al.
An adaptive foot device for increased gait and postural stability in lower limb orthoses and exoskeletons, International Journal of Control, Automation, and Systems 9(3): 515-524.
Ekso Bionics develops exoskeletons, or wearable robots, which have a variety of applications in the medical, military, industrial, and consumer markets.
In the medical sector, exoskeletons for rehabilitation and even long-term personal use at home are receiving approval.
The Campaign revolves around the idea where giant robotic exoskeletons which lands on this planet and are commanded by a single user who is holding a Voice device.