exogenous

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exogenous

 [eks-oj´ĕ-nus]
1. developed or originating outside the organism, as exogenous disease.
2. growing by additions to the outside.

ex·og·e·nous

(eks-oj'ĕ-nŭs),
Originating or produced outside of the organism.
Synonym(s): ectogenous, exogenetic
[exo- + G. -gen, production]

exogenous

/ex·og·e·nous/ (ek-soj´ĕ-nus) originating outside or caused by factors outside the organism.

exogenous

(ĕk-sŏj′ə-nəs)
adj.
1. Originating externally: an exogenous model of economic growth.
2. Originating or produced from outside a cell, tissue, or organism: exogenous antioxidants.

ex·og′e·nous·ly adv.
ex·og′e·ny (-ə-mē) n.

exogenous

[igzoj′ənəs]
Etymology: Gk, exo + genein, to produce
1 outside the body.
2 originating outside the body or an organ of the body or produced from external causes, such as a disease caused by a bacterial or viral agent foreign to the body. Compare endogenous. exogenic, adj.

ex·og·e·nous

(eks-oj'ĕ-nŭs)
Originating or produced outside of the organism.
Synonym(s): ectogenous.
[exo- + G. -gen, production]

exogenous

Having an external origin or cause.

exogenous

  1. originating from or due to external causes.
  2. developing near the surface of an organism, as in the development of axillary buds in plants.

exogenous

originating or produced outside the body or organ

ex·og·e·nous

(eks-oj'ĕ-nŭs)
Originating or produced outside of the organism.
Synonym(s): ectogenous.
[exo- + G. -gen, production]

exogenous (eksoj´ənəs),

adj originating or caused by aspects external to a body.

exogenous

originating outside or caused by factors outside the organism.

exogenous fecal contents
e.g. calcium taken in with the diet but not absorbed; is distinct from endogenous calcium which is contributed by the body.
exogenous photodynamic agent
agent contributed by the environment; may be a primary agent or a hepatoxin.
References in periodicals archive ?
Government and the legislature exist both as exogeneous regulators of these processes and as entities within them.
1983] call 'weak exogeneity' roughly corresponds to the error terms assumption, causal interpretation has to do with what they call 'superexogeneity', which means by definition that the model is weakly exogeneous and structurally invariant with respect to its parameters.
Second, prices, wages, and other exogeneous variables will influence the demand for inputs to the production of infant health, such as breastfeeding, infant formula, other foods, and the child care time inputs of the mother and others, and will also influence the labor supply behavior of the mother.
In addition to the influence that the export or exogeneous economy has on a region, its organization and growth are simultaneously determined by how its residents choose to spend their income.
Unemployment Insurance (UI) enters in the form of a dichotomous variable, and the practice of other studies of treating UI receipt as exogeneous is followed here.
Difference between selected exogeneous variables used to generate 1995 projections values as published and as generated by a 10-percent error
huHER3-8, a novel humanized anti-HER3 antibody that inhibits exogeneous ligand-independent proliferation of tumor cells" (Abstract #4564).
Involvement of the quino protein glucose dehydrogenase in the solubilizing of exogeneous mineral phosphates by gram negative bacteria.
With exogeneous surfactant administration lung adaptation develops, oxygen requirement ([FiO.
First stage regression estimates for the probability of enrollment (high school age) (n=19,022) number of number of days drank drinks in binge Exogeneous Variables in past year past month drinking Risk of bodily harm from -22.
As a result, we treat analyst following as an exogeneous variable in our multivariate analysis.
Using a general equilibrium framework where income is exogeneous, Berkovic and Fullerton (1992) find that average housing consumption would reduce between 3 and 6 percent.