exoenzyme

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exoenzyme

 [ek″so-en´zīm]
an enzyme that acts outside the cell that secretes it.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

ex·tra·cel·lu·lar en·zyme

an enzyme performing its functions outside a cell, for example, the various digestive enzymes.
Synonym(s): exoenzyme
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

exoenzyme

(ĕk′sō-ĕn′zīm′)
n.
An enzyme, such as a digestive enzyme, that functions outside the cell from which it originates.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

ex·tra·cel·lu·lar en·zyme

(eks'tră-sel'yŭ-lăr en'zīm)
An enzyme performing its functions outside a cell (e.g., the various digestive enzymes).
Synonym(s): exoenzyme.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

exoenzyme

An enzyme that operates outside the cell in which it was formed.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
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References in periodicals archive ?
The lux autoinducer regulates the production of exoenzyme virulence determinants in Erwinia carotovora and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.
However, further studies are necessary to understand the role of individual bacteria and the exoenzymes in bloom regulation.
It is also known that high production of trypsin-like exoenzymes is characteristic of pathogenic forms of fungi [29].
Aeromonas hydrophila is capable of producing several virulence factors, including cytotoxins, enterotoxins, hemagglutinins, and exoenzymes. As was seen in our case, resulting cellulitis typically develops within 48 hours of exposure to water.
The destruction of aggregates may lead to exposure of the inner core of organic substances, facilitating the accessibility of organic substances for microorganisms and exoenzymes, and oxygen diffusion (Six et al.
Cellobiohy-drolases are exoenzymes and hydrolyze crystalline cellulose, which further releases cellobiose.
AMS produced by Bacillus strains can be small molecules, which are structurally rather diverse, including bacteriocin and exoenzymes, like proteases, RNA-degrading enzymes, cell wall lytic enzymes and amylases (Hyronimus et al., 1998; Cherif et al., 2001; Van t'Hof et al., 2001).
When organic matter reaches the aquatic environment, under anaerobic conditions it tends to be completely degraded by the action of esterase exoenzymes and transformed into inorganic compounds.
Shortage of oxygen and diffusion of exoenzymes inhibit mycelial growth and wood decomposition processes (Rayner and Boddy 1988).
Hence, we recognise two types of enzymes on the basis of site of action: intracellular enzymes or endozymes (functioning in the cell), and extracellular enzymes or exoenzymes (functioning outside the cell).