flying fish

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Related to Exocoetidae: family Exocoetidae

flying fish

a species of fish (Cypselurus californicus) in which the pectoral fins are enlarged and act as aerofoils when the fish leaps out of the water, enabling it to glide up to 50 m, possibly to escape predators.
References in periodicals archive ?
Taxa include Argonauta spp., Gonatus antarcticus, Ancistrocheirus lesueurii, the diamond squid (Thysanoteuthis rhombus), Japetella diaphana, flying fish (Exocoetidae) eggs, the Peruvian anchoveta (Engraulis ringens), and the jumbo squid (Dosidicus gigas).
The most frequently consumed prey was flying fishes (belonging to the family Exocoetidae; 42.7 and 19.2% according to PRA and DO, respectively) and needlefish (belonging to the family Belonidae; 38.5 and 6.4% according to PRA and DO, respectively).
Last week, a Mediterranean flying fish, identified as Cheilopogon heterurus, was caught off the coast of Devon The fish is found in tropical and subtropical waters and has been recorded in the Bahamas, Australia and the Meditteranean Some experts blamed global warming for the capture of this fish so far north Although a rare find in UK waters, it was previously recorded even further north in the waters around Denmark and southern Norway The fish, which is a member of the Exocoetidae family, is a type of beloniform needlefish and reaches an adult size of about 40cm It often leaps from the water using propulsion from its powerful tail and 'flies' with the aid of its massively oversized pectoral fins
This flying fish is typical of the fish (family Exocoetidae) that boaters often see skimming above the Pacific Ocean around Santa Catalina Island.
(1996) reported that only needlefishes (Belonidae) and flying-fishes (Exocoetidae) consistently occur with halfbeaks in these catches.
The scombereosocids belong to the order Beloniformes that also includes other pelagic species, such as halfbeaks (Hemirhamphidae) and flying fish (Exocoetidae), relatively important in coastal tropical waters.
3.20 Octopodidae Octopus rubescens 3.20 Crustacea Squillidae Squillid mantis shrimps 2.52 Euphausiidae Nyctiphanes simplex 2.52 Galatheidae Pleuroncodes planipes 2.52 Penaeidae Penaeid shrimps 2.52 Teleostei Clupeidae Harengula thrissina 3.10 Phosichthyidae Vinciguerria lucetia 3.00 Hemiramphidae Oxyporhamphus micropterus 3.10 Exocoetidae Exocoetus spp.
SQUATINIDAE Squatina californica 0.02 0.01 DASYATIDIDAE Dasyatis brevis 0.07 0.02 UROLOPHIDAE Urobatis concentricus 0.01 Urobatis halleri 0.00 0.11 0.09 Urobatis maculatus 0.04 0.03 ELOPIDAE Elops affinis 0.13 0.09 MURAENIDAE Gymnomuraena zebra 0.02 0.01 Gymnothorax equatorialis 0.02 0.01 Gymnothorax castaneus 0.09 0.07 0.07 0.06 CLUPEIDAE Harengula trissina 0.03 EXOCOETIDAE Exocoetus spp.
15.10 0.01 Euphausiacea 11.00 < 0.01 Decapoda Galatheidae Pleuroncodes planipes 1937.00 0.84 Osteichthyes Clupeiformes Clupeidae 3206.00 1.39 Etrumeus teres 19681.00 8.52 Opisthonema libertate 4985.00 2.16 Sardinops caeruleus 36492.00 15.79 Gadiformes Merlucciidae Merluccius productus 16619.00 7.19 Exocoetidae Exocoetus spp.
As worldwide demand for fish roe has increased in recent years (Iversen, 1990), roe products have been developed and prepared from such diverse species groups as the lumpfish (Cyclopteridae) in the North Atlantic (Stevenson and Baird, 1988), flying-fishes (Exocoetidae) in the tropics, capelin (Osmeridae) in more boreal waters (Iversen, 1990), and striped mullet (Mugilidae) along the southeastern United States (Leard et al., 1995).