existential psychology

ex·is·ten·tial psy·chol·o·gy

a theory of psychology, based on the philosophies of phenomenology and existentialism, which holds that the proper study of psychology is a person's experience of the sequence, spatiality, and organization of his or her existence in the world.
References in periodicals archive ?
In Review of Existential Psychology and Psychiatry.
Yang, "Existential Psychology and the Way of the Tao: Meditations on the Writings of Zhuangzi" is comprised of fourteen erudite articles providing insightful and informative commentary on a selection of these parables.
Death Anxiety and Religious Belief: An Existential Psychology of Religion
Existential psychology, as outlined in Terror Management Theory, harnesses tremendous explanatory power by focusing on the ultimate driver of beliefs, behavior, and experiences: fear of death (Greenberg et al., 1990).
"Nostalgia: A Psychological Resource" by Clay Routledge (a leading expert in the psychology of nostalgia and experimental existential psychology) explains in detail what nostalgia is, how views of it have changed over time, and how it has been studied by social scientists.
International Journal of Existential Psychology and Psychotherapy, 3(2), 34-61.
Hoeller (Ed.), Readings in existential psychology and psychiatry (pp.
Introducing the approach to fellow psychotherapists, Farley (mental health counseling and psychology, Antioch U., Seattle) begins by summarizing the traditions of existential psychology and briefly describing its roots in philosophy.
We're forced to go through life with a psychology profoundly different from most people-a very divided existential psychology. To balance the conflict, we consider ourselves in two different ways, as superior or inferior, and this can be a conflict within itself.
The four givens, or premises, of the human condition that existential psychology addresses are discussed in this section.
In existential psychology, therefore, war trauma and torture may influence one's destiny.