excitation

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excitation

 [ek″si-ta´shun]
an act of irritation or stimulation; a condition of being excited or of responding to a stimulus; the addition of energy, as the excitation of a molecule by absorption of photons.
anomalous atrioventricular excitation Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome.
indirect excitation electrostimulation of a muscle by placing the electrode on its nerve.

ex·ci·ta·tion

(ek'sī-tā'shŭn),
1. The act of increasing the rapidity or intensity of the physical or mental processes.
See also: stimulation.
2. In neurophysiology, the complete all-or-none response of a nerve or muscle to an adequate stimulus, ordinarily including propagation of excitation along the membranes of the cell or cells involved.
See also: stimulation.

excitation

(ĕk′sī-tā′shən)
n.
1. The act or process of exciting or an instance of it.
2. The state or condition of being excited.
3. Physiology The activity produced in an organ, tissue, or part, such as a nerve cell, as a result of stimulation.

excitation

An MRI term for the delivery—i.e., induction or transfer—of energy into spinning nuclei via radio-frequency pulse(s), which bumps the nuclei into a higher energy state. By producing a net transverse magnetisation, an MRI system can evoke a response from the excited system.

ex·ci·ta·tion

(ek'sī-tā'shŭn)
1. The act of increasing the rapidity or intensity of physical or mental processes.
2. neurophysiology The complete all-or-none response of a nerve or muscle to an adequate stimulus, ordinarily including propagation of excitation along the membranes of the cell or cells involved.
See also: stimulation
3. The process whereby radiation causes a bound electron to vibrate or oscillate within its orbit.

excitation

the process by which the electrical stimulation of
  1. a surface membrane results in contraction of the muscle, or
  2. brings about secretion of a transmitter substance at a nerve ending.

ex·ci·ta·tion

(ek'sī-tā'shŭn)
Act of increasing the rapidity or intensity of the physical or mental processes.

Patient discussion about excitation

Q. I am excited to know in what way diet helps in preventing osteoporosis? my mother is suspecting to be having osteoporosis. She regularly complains of leg pain. Upon consultation with the doctor it was found with low calcium in her blood. She was given calcium tablets and was told to increase in the diet rich in calcium. She is taking milk and yoghurt especially. She is not well yet but shows some improvement. I am excited to know in what way diet helps in preventing osteoporosis?

A. you see, our bones are a giant storage of calcium. our body needs a very steady concentration of calcium, if it'll be low the body will take it form your bones. if there's too much- it'll either build bones (but only if he'll think he needs too- that is where sport get in the picture)or you'll urinate it.any way, you rather have large amount of calcium in your diet then less. but it's not enough- sport and other medication can help.

Q. my wife is pregnant !!! i am so excited ! this is the first time out of many i hope !!! but i have concerns that i would like to share with the community here ... i am afraid of being a bad father , i am afraid i won't know how to be a father ... where do u start ... how do i support my wife after the though experince ... how do i take care of the child ... a lot of things a re running through my mind with no answer ,can any one help me to calm down ????

A. you won't be a perfect father but you'll try to be. that's what's important. thousands of years of evolution gave you the basics. you'll be fine :)
congratulations!!

Q. Hello everyone !!! are you excited with the swearing of Obama To presidency??? i sure am !!! may we all get a little joy and peaceful time wit hour fresh president ... and let us all wish him a great start and a chance to change our lives ... Good Luck Mr.President Obama !!!

A. well said Mrfoot65! May all the people in America receive the healthcare treatment they need. God bless.

More discussions about excitation
References in periodicals archive ?
Hernandez-Ochoa et al., "S100A1 binds to the calmodulin-binding site of ryanodine receptor and modulates skeletal muscle excitation-contraction coupling," The Journal of Biological Chemistry, vol.
Luttgau, "The role of [Ca.sup.2+] ions in excitation-contraction coupling of skeletal muscle fibres," BBA--Reviews on Biomembranes, vol.
George Stephenson, "Effects of membrane cholesterol manipulation on excitation-contraction coupling in skeletal muscle of the toad," Journal of Physiology, vol.
Caffeine ingestion has been shown to reduce the sensation of pain induced by exercise [2], enhance excitation-contraction coupling [3], and stimulate the CNS [4] by altering motor unit recruitment and perceptions of fatigue via antagonism of the adenosine receptor.
Hernandez-Ochoa, Skeletal Muscle Excitation-Contraction Coupling in Muscle: Fundamental Biology and Mechanisms of Disease, J.
Due to non-genomic rapid increases in intracellular calcium levels and increased mobilisation of calcium from the sarcoplasmic reticulum, testosterone may reduce or protect against impaired excitation-contraction coupling during repeated high-intensity muscle contraction.
Maier, "Reactive oxygen species and excitation-contraction coupling in the context of cardiac pathology," Journal of Molecular and Cellular Cardiology, vol.
(2000) Excitation-contraction coupling in skeletal muscle: comparisons with cardiac muscle.
Eccentric exercise induces ultrastructural muscle damage within the sarcomere, leading to membrane damage and failure of the excitation-contraction coupling pathway (Koh, 2002; Warren et al., 2002).
These are the presence of disrupted force-bearing structures and damage to excitation-contraction coupling system (Proske and Allen, 2005; Warren et al., 2001; 2002).
There is no doubt whatever that the main reasons for the decrease in VEP and EEP were related to damage force-bearing structures (Clarkson and Hubal, 2002, Warren et al., 2001) and excitation-contraction coupling system (Prasartwuth et al., 2005; Warren et al., 2002).
According to McHugh (2003), the loss in strength following a bout of eccentric exercise could theoretically be due to a physical disruption of the force-generating structures (including a loss of myofibrillar contractile proteins) or a failure to activate intact force-generating structures within the muscle fibre (excitation-contraction coupling).