social insect

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social insect

any insect which lives in organized social groups; examples are ants, wasps, bees and termites, where different morphological forms carry out different duties within the colony
References in periodicals archive ?
"Eusociality: Origin and Consequences." Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 102.38 (2005): 13367-71.
As Wilson points out, "There is an a priori reason for believing campsites were the crucial adaptation on the path to eusociality: campsites are in essence nests made by humans.
The seeds of eusociality were planted in our species long before the dawn of agriculture, but once that happened and our numbers increased, all hell broke loose, so to speak.
The evolution of eusociality. Nature, 466, 1057-1062.
In a second mathematical analysis, the team investigated how eusociality could evolve through standard natural selection.
There is no general eusociality between components on the level of the ecosystem, although there is differential fitness, and this can be important at different stages of succession and community assembly.
Andersson (1984) reviewed the literature for the evolution of eusociality in insects and vertebrates, noting that several traits, including parental manipulation, appear to be preconditions for advanced sociality in both of these groups.
Others include R-selection (prolific breeding), the production of secondary metabolites (such as venoms), segmentation, eusociality and armour-plating.
The primitively social bees are of particular interest for studies of the evolution of sociality in insects, since they have members which are solitary, grading through various levels of complexity to eusociality. Here, eusociality is defined as the presence within a colony of overlapping generations of adults that cooperate in caring for a brood produced by a subset of colony members.
Brittany Sue Mason, Mackenzie Lovegrove's project involves trying to understand how honeybees evolved "eusociality"--the social structure where one female reproduces and the others rear her offspring.
It has been speculated that eusociality or haplodiploidy might have an impact on Wolbachia infection [50, 55], but such mechanisms have never been confirmed.