eurypterid

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eurypterid

any large extinct scorpion-like aquatic arthropod of the order Eurypterida, found in the SILURIAN PERIOD.
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Thelodonts, osteostracans, acanthodians and eurypterids are often found associated together along with ostracods and eurypterids in nearshore fades in BA1 environments (e.g., Denison 1956; Turner 1999).
There is still much to be learned from, and about, this diminutive Silurian predator that shared the seas with much larger eurypterids, and it is all thanks to Carl Fechko's discovery and generous donation of his unintended catch to the ROM.
In middle Saaremaa, microlaminated argillaceous Eurypterus-dolostones or domerites contain often lingulid, eurypterid, and agnathan remains (Uduvere-968 core, depth 3.0-6.0 m; Kuressaare-804 core, depth 22.0-25.7 m; Suurlahe-738 core, depth 17.5-22.5 m).
Near the base of the section plants, ostracods and eurypterids (Miller 1996; Miller 2007a), as well as fish (Kennedy et al.
Eurypterida.--The extinct eurypterids, or sea scorpions, are the most diverse Paleozoic chelicerates.
In Scotland, both pterygotids and hughmillerids are believed to have inhabited lacustrine environments, while stylonurid eurypterids inhabited fluvial environments.
Studies by ROM paleontologist Dave Rudkin and colleages of 450- to 400-million-year-old fossil arthropods--including trilobites, eurypterids, and horseshoe crabs--from the Hudson Bay and James Bay lowlands are revealing exciting new information on ancient biodiversity and evolutionary dynamics.
In prehistoric times, the ocean floor that is now New York State was home to multitudes of trilobites and eurypterids - groups of arthropods that are now extinct.
TEHRAN (FNA)- The findings by a team of researchers reinterpreted the habits, capabilities, and ecological role of the giant pterygotid eurypterid, the largest arthropod that ever lived.
The big kahuna of New York fossils is the eurypterid, or giant sea scorpion.
EURYPTERID fossils are fairly common in New York State but very rare in the rest of the world.
New York's state fossil is the eurypterid. A close relative of horseshoe crabs, scorpions and spiders, the eurypterid lived more than 400 million years ago.