European Working Time Directive

European Working Time Directive

A European Union mandate introduced in 1998 which is designed to protect the health and safety of workers by restricting the number of hours an individual can work and imposing minimum rest periods. In brief, the EWTD limits the average weekly working time to 48 hours; limits night workers’ average daily working time to 8 hours; requires that employers offer health assessments to night workers; and imposes minimum daily and weekly rest periods and rest breaks at work.

European Working Time Directive, specifics
• ≤ 48 hours work/week (averaged over reference period of 26 weeks).
• Maximum of 13 hours continuous duty on a full-shift rota.
• 11 hours continuous rest in 24 hours.
• 24 hours continuous rest in 7 days.
• Never more than 12 consecutive days on duty (followed by a minimum of 48 hours off duty).
• Minimum of 4 weeks paid annual leave.
• 20-minute break in work periods of over 6 hours.
• For night workers, an average of ≤ 8 hours work in 24 over the reference period.
References in periodicals archive ?
The fanatics scrapping the European working time directive would be a gift-wrapped present for bad bosses.
Limits on working time and the rightto-be-paid annual leave comes from the European Working Time Directive, while the protection offered to employees on the transfer of a business (TUPE) are based solely on European law.
The European Working Time Directive provides employees with a number of rights including limits on the number of hours they can work, and entitlements to rest breaks, breaks between working days and holiday entitlement.
Most junior doctors work shift patterns and a system is needed to ensure these rotas are New Deal and European Working Time Directive (EWTD) complaint.
The position of a majority of trade unions is to support "Social Europe", citing the benefits of, for instance, the European Working Time Directive.
Unison also believes that the changes break the European Working Time directive.
The European Working Time Directive is a prime example of how the EU can protect workers.
Our opt-out from the European Working Time Directive, which caps the working week at 48 hours, means one fifth of our workers regularly work longer.
Prof Williams said that he tells trainees: "No matter what the European working time directive says, you are professionals, you have a duty to your patients.
In accordance with the European working time directive, we must be given a break after six hours.
The RCS blames costs on the introduction of EU regulations to reduce doctors' hours, called the European Working Time Directive (EWTD).
The RCS blames cost rises on the introduction of EU regulations to reduce doctors' hours, called the European Working Time Directive (EWTD).

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