EEC

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EEC

Abbreviation for:
ectodermal dysplasia with ectrodactyly and cleft lip or palate
endometrial epithelial cells
enteropathogenic Escherichia coli
European Economic Community 
exstrophy-epispadias complex
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References in periodicals archive ?
3055/2009 for the approval of accounting regulations harmonized with Directive IV of the European Economic Community and the International Accounting Standards, published in the Official Gazette 766, with subsequent amendments.
The United States and the European Economic Community, which formerly imported 10 and 20 percent of Africa's ivory respectively, will ban all imports except of legally acquired game "trophies." Japan, which formerly imported 38 percent of all African ivory, has vowed to import only whole tusks.
We joined the European Economic Community ("Common Market") in 1972 without an explicit vote on the matter.
In 1963, Turkey and the European Economic Community (the EU's former name) signed an association agreement.
Over the next 42 years however, the Common Market was side-lined and morphed into the EEC, the European Economic Community. The EEC has moved again into what is now the European Union.
We were already in the EEC - the European Economic Community - in 1975, having been taken in, without referendum, by Edward Heath in 1973.
3 It was originally set up as the European Economic Community in 1958 with six members: Belgium, Germany, France, Italy, Luxembourg and the Netherlands.
Britain joined the European Economic Community (EEC) or Common Market in 1973 and a referendum on whether to remain in it was first held in 1975, in which around 67% voted in favour.
WHEN, in the 1970s, the people of Britain voted for closer ties with Europe, it was via the European Economic Community, designed to facilitate unrestricted trade between member nations.
I found some interesting views on the European Economic Community.
1961: Britain first applied for membership of EU forerunner the European Economic Community - a bid vetoed by French leader Charles de Gaulle, who suspected UK membership would allow greater US interference.
Contrary to interpretations that see Irish politics in the post-war era as defined largely by isolationism, Murphy (politics, Dublin City U., Ireland) argues that Irish political leaders were actively engaged in search of an economic "promised land" and that this search was successfully reflected in the decision to apply for entry into the European Economic Community and in the development of the "social partnership" agreements between government, employer groups, and trade unions regarding wage, tax, and welfare issues that began in the 1980s.

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