eukaryote

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Related to Eukaryotic cells: Prokaryotes, Plasmids

eukaryote

 [u-kar´e-ōt]
an organism of the Eucaryotae, whose cells (eukaryotic cells) have a true nucleus that is bounded by a nuclear membrane, contains the chromosomes, and divides by mitosis. Eukaryotic cells also contain membrane-bound organelles, such as mitochondria, chloroplasts, lysosomes, and the Golgi apparatus. Plants and animals, protozoa, fungi, and algae (except blue-green algae) are eukaryotes. Other organisms (the bacteria) are prokaryotes.

eu·kar·y·ote

(yū-kar'ē-ōt),
1. A cell containing a membrane-bound nucleus with chromosomes of DNA and proteins, generally large (10-100 mcm), with cell division involving a form of mitosis in which mitotic spindles (or some microtubule arrangement) are involved; mitochondria are present, and, in photosynthetic species, plastids are found; undulipodia (cilia or flagella) are of the complex 9+2 organization of microtubules and various proteins. Possession of an eukaryote type of cell characterizes the four kingdoms above the Monera or prokaryote level of complexity: Protoctista, Fungi, Plantae, and Animalia, combined into the superkingdom Eukaryotae.
2. Common name for members of the Eukaryotae.
Synonym(s): eucaryote
[eu- + G. karyon, kernel, nut]

eukaryote

/eu·kary·ote/ (u-kar´e-ōt) an organism whose cells have a true nucleus bounded by a nuclear membrane within which lie the chromosomes; eukaryotic cells also contain many membrane-bound organelles in which cellular functions are performed. The cells of higher plants and animals, fungi, protozoa, and most algae are eukaryotic. Cf. prokaryote.

eukaryote

also

eucaryote

(yo͞o-kăr′ē-ōt, -ē-ət)
n.
Any of various single-celled or multicellular organisms of the domain Eukaryota, characterized by cells that contain a distinct membrane-bound nucleus and by the occurrence of DNA transcription inside the nucleus and protein synthesis in the cytoplasm, in contrast to prokaryotes.

eu·kar′y·ot′ic (-ŏt′ĭk) adj.

eukaryote

[yo̅o̅ker′ē·ot]
Etymology: Gk, eu + karyon, nut
an organism whose cells contain a true nucleus. All organisms except bacteria are eukaryotes. Also spelled eucaryote. Eukaryotic, adj.

eu·kar·y·ote

(yū-kar'ē-ōt)
1. A cell containing a membrane-bound nucleus with chromosomes of DNA, RNA, and proteins, with cell division involving a form of mitosis in which mitotic spindles (or some microtubule arrangement) are involved; mitochondria are present, and, in photosynthetic species, plastids are found. Possession of a eukaryote type of cell characterizes the four kingdoms above the Monera or prokaryote level of complexity: Protoctista, Fungi, Plantae, and Animalia, combined into the superkingdom Eukaryotae.
2. Common name for members of the Eukaryotae.
[eu- + G. karyon, kernel, nut]

eukaryote

Any organism each of whose cells contains a well defined nucleus with a nuclear membrane in which the genetic material is carried in the chromosomes. Only bacteria and blue-green algae are not eukaryotes. The word is also spelled eucaryote.
Eukaryoteclick for a larger image
Fig. 155 Eukaryote . A comparison of prokaryotes and eukaryotes.

eukaryote

or

eucaryote

any member ofa group of organisms that contains all plants, fungi and animals, but not bacteria (which are PROKARYOTES). Eukaryotes are distinguished by the fact that their cells possess a membrane-bound nucleus containing the genetic material, but there are also other differences from the prokaryotes.

eukaryote

an organism of the Eucaryotae, whose cells have a true nucleus bounded by a nuclear membrane and containing the chromosomes and which divide by mitosis. Eukaryotic cells also contain membrane-bound organelles, such as mitochondria, chloroplasts, lysosomes and the Golgi apparatus. Plants and animals, protozoa, fungi and algae (except blue-green algae) are eukaryotes. Other organisms (the bacteria) are prokaryotes.
References in periodicals archive ?
Implications of organelle division machineries and organelle inheritance regarding the origin of eukaryotic cells
A typical experiment for demonstrating the effect of bacterial co-culture on eukaryotic cell viability would involve culturing a specific eukaryotic cell type such as endothelial cells.
20 million years old), distinctive, and interpretable that we feel justified that modern termite associations help us interpret the evolutionary history of motile anaerobic eukaryotic cells.
Microtubules are relatively small structures found in all eukaryotic cells and characterized by a tubular or spaghettilike appearance.
As these structures were present all around the surface of the organisms, they might show up as thin and long appendages or as fat 'blisters' which appear to signify a structural expression of acquisition of a virulent state (6,7) during close cross-talk with host eukaryotic cells.
The origin of the more complicated eukaryotic cell type has been partially elucidated by the now widely-accepted endosymbiont theory, which posits that two of the major membrane-bound compartments of eukaryotic cells--mitochondria, the energy-making organelles, and chloroplasts, the organelles where photosynthesis occurs in plant cells--were formed from ancient bacteria that invaded the cytoplasm of an ancient proto-eukaryotic cell and eventually took up residence in that cell.
The abstract describes the technology as follows: Methods and Composition for producing single-stranded cloned DNA (ss-cDNA) with a vector based system in eukaryotic cells.
These inhibitors play important roles in mediating cell growth arrest in response to a wide variety of biological stimuli, and as a family, may constitute the most important growth arrest mechanism in eukaryotic cells.
Virtually all the damage in aging eukaryotic cells, including the damage that causes them to stop dividing, can be accounted for by something called oxidative stress.
It is axiomatic that the establishment of the stable association that characterizes modern eukaryotic cells necessitated certain sequelae to this initial interaction (Buss 1987; Maynard Smith 1991).
This newly issued patent provides the company with broad claims to many of the methods used by DNE nucleases to modify eukaryotic cells.
Versatile and modular electroporator for reproducible transformation of prokaryotic acterial, yeast & microorganisms) and eukaryotic cells (insects)