eugenics

(redirected from Eugenicists)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

eugenics

 [u-jen´iks]
the study and control of procreation as a means of improving hereditary characteristics of future generations. The concept has sometimes been used in a pseudoscientific way as an excuse for unethical, racist, or even genocidal practices such as involuntary sterilization or certain other practices in Nazi Germany and elsewhere.
macro eugenics eugenics policies that affect whole populations or groups. This has sometimes led to racism and genocide, such as the Nazi policies of sterilization and extermination of ethnic groups.
micro eugenics eugenics policies affecting only families or kinship groups; such policies are directed mainly at women and thus raise special ethical issues.
negative eugenics that concerned with prevention of reproduction by individuals considered to have inferior or undesirable traits.
positive eugenics that concerned with promotion of optimal mating and reproduction by individuals considered to have desirable or superior traits.

eu·gen·ics

(yū-jen'iks),
1. Practices and policies, as of mate selection or of sterilization, which tend to better the innate qualities of progeny and human stock.
2. Practices and genetic counseling directed to anticipating genetic disability and disease.
Synonym(s): orthogenics
[G. eugeneia, nobility of birth, fr. eu, well, + genesis, production]

eugenics

(yo͞o-jĕn′ĭks)
n. (used with a sing. verb)
The study or practice of attempting to improve the human gene pool by encouraging the reproduction of people considered to have desirable traits and discouraging or preventing the reproduction of people considered to have undesirable traits.

eu·gen′ic adj.
eu·gen′i·cal·ly adv.

eugenics

[yo̅o̅jen′iks]
Etymology: Gk, eu + genein, to produce
the study of methods for controlling the characteristics of populations through selective breeding.

eu·gen·ics

(yū-jen'iks)
1. Practices and policies, as in mate selection or sterilization, which tend to better the innate qualities of progeny and human stock.
2. Practices and genetic counseling directed to anticipating genetic disability and disease.
[G. eugeneia, nobility of birth, fr. eu, well, + genesis, production]

eugenics

The study or practice of trying to improve the human race by encouraging the breeding of those with desired characteristics (positive eugenics) or by discouraging the breeding of those whose characteristics are deemed undesirable (negative eugenics). The concept implies that there exists some person or institution capable of making such decisions. It also implies possible grave interference with human rights. For these reasons, the principles, which have long been successfully applied to domestic animals, have never been adopted for humans except by despots such as Adolf Hitler.

eugenics

the study of ways of improving the hereditary qualities of a population (especially the human population) by the application of social controls, guided by genetical principles.

Eugenics

A social movement in which the population of a society, country, or the world is to be improved by controlling the passing on of hereditary information through mating.
Mentioned in: Gene Therapy
References in periodicals archive ?
According to Ryan, poverty would inevitably be interpreted by eugenicists as a hereditary defect and that their methods were simply "inexpensive short-cuts" proposed by individuals who "are thinking only of comparative costs and quick results.
And Kuhl shows that a small group of American eugenicists and race anthropologists were blatantly anti-Semitic.
Moreover, the interwar eugenicists believed that poor physical types gravitated toward the lowest social strata.
These powerful eugenicists have put systems in place that will guarantee their power for generations to come.
While most American eugenicists rejected the idea of eugenic euthanasia, the medical establishment in Germany had no such qualms.
Yet social-radical eugenicists, of whom there were a number on both sides of the Atlantic, were impatient with measures that sought to achieve human improvement within the constraints of conventional marriage and conception.
Weingarten says that in the 1930s, German and American eugenicists "closely collaborated and borrowed from each other's work.
There are plenty of controversial moments in the history of birth control, including Sanger's alliance with wealthy eugenicists and the testing of the pill in Puerto Rico.
Sharon Leon offers a close reading of texts produced by high-ranking American Catholics in concert with the texts of leading local eugenicists to trace a complicated relationship that at moments overlapped, but over time evolved into a contentious and deeply divided set of views over the sanctity of human life and its reproduction.
Many early scientific journals focusing on heredity in plants and lower organisms were published by eugenicists and included "scientific" articles on human eugenics-promoting studies of heredity.
Several of these eugenicists were founding leaders of the NCUMHC, including Sybil Neville Rolfe, the first deputy chair.
For example, Mendelian genetics arose and was appropriated by eugenicists to falsely link complex personal attributes to heredity.