eudaimonia

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eudaimonia

(ū″dī-mōn′ē-ă, dĭ) [Gr. eudaimonia, good fortune, happiness]
A sense of fulfillment that arises from achieving one's full potential as a human being.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Overall, the gratefulness campaign in the intervention group seemed to have a moderate positive effect on eudaimonic happiness.
To move from short-lived hedonistic pleasure to lasting eudaimonic pleasure, swap:
The eudaimonic perspective is more akin to Maslow's (1943) concept of self-actualization and Tilden's (1957) concept of provocation.
In sum, the goal of the present study was to investigate the goal-well being relationship, in a New Zealand context, taking a dimensional approach to life goals and by assessing both hedonic and eudaimonic well being.
Lent and Brown (2008) suggested setting realistic but challenging goals and assisting clients in goal progress as a way to increase eudaimonic well-being.
The eudaimonic definition of subjective well-being can be subdivided into psychological well-being and social well-being.
Thus, virtues such as gratitude may not always result from the most pleasant circumstances, but gratitude's eudaimonic positivity is meaningful, moral, and even associated with stress reduction.
In this eudaimonic way of looking at research engagement, we see that it requires giving your students a sense that the research you do is meaningful--not just for their survival in the educational training program but for life and church.
In line with current research on well-being, we differentiated between hedonic and eudaimonic well-being using life satisfaction and vigor as indicators.
On happiness and human potentials: A review of hedonic and eudaimonic well-being.
What is not MacIntyrean, however, is Adams' insistent denial of the "unity of the virtues." Although quite Aristotelian in his dialectic, eudaimonic, and common-sense methodology, and especially in his defense of a universal human telos; and although quite Platonic in his repeated references to a real, transcendent good to which we approach but never possess in our pursuit of virtue; Adams is firmly against the classical theory of the virtues, arguing that the virtues do not at all imply each other, and that a firm possession of most of the virtues, let alone all of them, is humanly impossible.