transubstantiation

(redirected from Eucharist)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

transubstantiation

(trăn″sŭb-stăn″shē-ā′shŭn) [″ + substantia, substance]
The process of replacing one tissue for another.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
This day-long programme begins with a lecture by the Dean of Coventry, John Witcombe, on the materiality of the offertory at the Eucharist; the architectural historian, Judi Loach, on the reordering of the sanctuary in the wake of the Liturgical Movement and with specific reference to designs by George Pace; Christopher Irvine on the paintings of Ceri Richards in their relation to the reredos; and Louise Campbell on Geoffrey Clarke's altar set for Coventry Cathedral.
BERNaRDEZ composed two explicit meditations on the Eucharist: "Poem of the Eucharistic Bread" and "Poem of the Eucharistic Wine," published in the Argentine daily La Nacion in 1946 and 1947, respectively.
Garrison's discussion of the medieval Eucharist's manipulation of literal and figurative, accident and substance, continues into Chapter 3, 'Christ's Allegorical Bodies and the failure of Community in Piers Plowman'.
We see this process of inspiration in the four stages or graces of the Eucharist: take, bless, break and give.
Excerpted from Being Christian: Baptism, Bible, Eucharist, Prayer
Finally, the "Totus Tuus" Pope relates the Holy Eucharist to the Mother of God.
That's not to say that the Eucharist doesn't have something to say about a $17 hamburger in a world in which 2 billion people live on $2 a day; it just doesn't have anything to do with a poorly placed host.
The Eucharist in particular runs the great risk of reification as many people think of the sacramental elements of bread and wine as the Eucharist rather than the action of giving thanks, as the Greek eucharistia denotes.
In the first section of the encyclical, the Eucharist is presented as gift, and in the third as mission.
Chapter Four argues that the Eucharist is the proper work of the church.
Many of the centuries-long controversies over the eucharist appear to have been caused by a restricted vocabulary; recent liturgical scholarship has allowed the ecumenical dialogues to place the eucharist in a larger context.
Cummings, Canterbury Cousins: The Eucharist in Contemporary Anglican Theology, New York, Paulist Press, 2007, 174 pp., $22.95