Eubacterium

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Eubacterium

 [u″bak-tē´re-um]
a genus of gram-positive, anaerobic, rod-shaped organisms occurring as saprophytes in soil and water. They are normal flora of the skin and body cavities and occasionally cause soft tissue infection. Species include E. alactoly´�ticum, E. len´tum, and E. limo´sum.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

Eubacterium

(yū'bak-tēr'ē-ŭm),
A genus containing more than 40 species of anaerobic, non-spore-forming, nonmotile bacteria containing straight or curved gram-positive rods that usually occur singly, in pairs, or in short chains. Usually these organisms attack carbohydrates. They may be pathogenic, and rarely are associated with intraabdominal sepsis in humans. The type species is Eubacterium limosum.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

eubacterium

(yo͞o′băk-tîr′ē-əm)
n. pl. eubac·teria (-tîr′ē-ə)
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

Eu·bac·te·ri·um

(yū'bak-tēr'ē-ŭm)
A genus of anaerobic, non-spore-forming, nonmotile bacteria containing straight or curved gram-positive rods that usually occur singly, in pairs, or in short chains. Usually these organisms attack carbohydrates. They are often associated with mixed infections involving the abdomen, pelvis, or genitourinary tract. The type species is E. limosum.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

Eu·bac·te·ri·um

(yū'bak-tēr'ē-ŭm)
Genus containing more than 40 species of anaerobic, non-spore-forming, nonmotile bacteria containing straight or curved gram-positive rods that usually occur singly, in pairs, or in short chains. Usually these organisms attack carbohydrates; may be pathogenic, but rarely are associated with intraabdominal sepsis in humans.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012