Eubacterium rectale

Eu·bac·te·ri·um rec·ta·'le

a bacterial species found in association with a rectal ulcer; occurs in the rectum.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Bacteroidetes, Ruminococcus gnavus, and Fusobacterium were increased in patients with GAD compared with controls, while Faecalibacterium, Eubacterium rectale, Sutterella, Lachnospira, and Butyricicoccus were increased in healthy controls.
The animal-based diet increased the abundance of bile-tolerant microorganisms (Alistipes, Bilophila and Bacteroides) and decreased the levels of Firmicutes that metabolize dietary plant polysaccharides (Roseburia, Eubacterium rectale and Ruminococcus bromii).
Roseburia eubacterium rectale became the predominant species.
[28] reported that diet containing polyphenols (e.g., +catechin) increased the growth of the Clostridium coccoides, Eubacterium rectale, Bifidobacterium spp., and Escherichia coli, but significantly decreased the growth of the Clostridium histolyticum group.
Bacteria 1% Selenomonas sputigena ATCC 35185 Bacteria 1% Eubacterium rectale M104/1 Bacteria 1% Eubacterium siraeum V10Sc8a Bacteria 1% others Bacteria 32% others Eukaryota 1% Note: Table made from pie chart.
The finely ground almonds significantly increased the populations of bifidobacteria and Eubacterium rectale, resulting in a higher prebiotic index (4.43) than was found for the commercial prebiotic fructooligosaccharides (4.08) at 24 h of incubation.
We found that finely ground almonds significantly increased the population of bifidobacteria and Eubacterium rectale, resulting in a higher prebiotic index (4.43) compared with the commercial prebiotic fructo-oligosaccharides (4.08) at 24 hour incubation, although no significant differences in the proportions of gut bacteria groups were detected in response to defatted finely ground almonds."
One study found a plant-based diet, which leads to an increase in the population of Firmicutes (Roseburia, Ruminococcus bromii, and Eubacterium rectale) and the transition to a meat-based diet leads to an increase in the number of Alistipes, Bilophila, and Bacteroides [115].