ethnology

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ethnology

 [eth-nol´o-je]
1. the branch of anthropology that deals with the study of the origin and descent of human races and ethnic groups and their distribution and relationships.
2. the science of comparing and analyzing transcultural differences and similarities and developing theoretical postulations and generalizations from the findings.

eth·nol·o·gy

(eth-nol'ŏ-jē),
The science that compares human culture and/or races; cultural anthropology.

ethnology

/eth·nol·o·gy/ (eth-nol´ah-je) the science dealing with the major cultural groups of humans, their descent, relationship, etc.

ethnology

the study of the distribution, relationships and origins of the races of mankind.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The 2006 decree stipulated that the purpose of the Ethnology Mission was "[the] study and promotion, as it was for other qualified bodies, of the various aspects of tangible and intangible heritage throughout the entire nation which are of interest to ethnologists or which fall within the administration's field of action, especially architecture and the regions.
The national costume is the only, main cultural phenomenon that can separate us from all the other people on the Balkans, even Europe and the world," said ethnologist Aleksandar Todorovski.
Like other ethnologists at that time, Richards published sensitive cultural information presumably without consent.
Koppers Indien", meaning 29 cylinders with traditional music of the Bhil in India, recorded by the Vienna ethnologist Wilhelm Koppers (1886-1961) in Rambhapur in 1939.
It is an encyclopaedic compilation of snippets and vignettes from chroniclers, ethnologists and social anthropologists about conquistadores, indigenous peoples and civilizations, guano, fisheries, whaling, sugar cane, precious minerals, dams and even petrol.
Between the First and Second World Wars, Romania was something of a magnet for ethnologists, music historians and photographers.
Further, Kennedy is also intriguing in chronicling the translators' stated motives for publishing, and the multiple audiences targeted, with various translators reaching out to historians or ethnologists, or trying to emulate the sentence patterns of Old Norse and avoid the indigestible archaisms of William Morris.
The topic of endangered languages and literatures, brought into focus within the pages of this issue primarily through the conscientious efforts of two of WLT's most distinguished interns, Sydneyann Binion and David Shook (see their headnote on page 14), is addressed by a host of renowned writers, linguists, literary critics, and ethnologists, who have generously and often passionately offered their expertise.
Greenberg aims for his disaster timeline to aid in the study of such events by epidemiologists, toxicologists, sociologists, ethnologists, geographers, and other interested scholars.
The second part of the book includes contributions and recollections by his friends, some eminent ethnologists in their own right and by his wife Betty.
Just as colonial-era ethnologists would eagerly 'discover' tribes that were often more appropriately parts of much larger groups, so languages in Africa have much greater affinity to each other than is commonly believed.
Mann, a writer for Science and The Atlantic, wrote 1491 to present to nonspecialist readers discoveries made in recent decades by historians, archeologists, biologists, and ethnologists studying the indigenous peoples of the Americas.