ethnography

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ethnography

 [eth-nog´rah-fe]
1. a description of the activities of a group and the beliefs held by group members.
2. study of the lifestyles, beliefs, and norms of a selected group through observation, participation, and analysis. Ethnographic research includes studies of patterns of behavior, known as culture traits, and the relationships between patterns of behavior. Ethnographic inquiry may be on selected topics, such as health and illness, and may ask questions such as “Do fathers in this culture attend the birth of a child?” or “What does a family member do immediately after the birth of a child?”
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

ethnography

A qualitative research technique which allows the generation of a detailed description of a culture or subculture based on observation, interviews and dialogue, and the genealogical analysis of kinships, descent and marriage using diagrams, symbols and questionnaires.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

ethnography

the descriptive study of the races of mankind.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
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References in periodicals archive ?
If readers look to ethnographic fiction as "better representations of culture than standard academic ethnographies," that distance becomes hard to navigate without a willingness to understand self-conscious fiction (Hill 161).
Her chapter on Lawrence, Huxley, and "ethnographic tourism" in the American Southwest is fascinating (although it feels like an abrupt shift in focus from ethnographies mainly located within British colonies).
The approach lays stress on the narrative presence of "others" in ethnographies (Marcus and Cushman 1982:43).
He categorizes ethnographies by area of inquiry--organizational processes and informal relations, organizational identity and change, organizational environments, and organizational morality and conflict--and places each of the book's main chapters in these categories.
Consequently, new ethnographies provide a scholarly challenge to deepen out understanding of the world, our relation to it, and to one another.
In contrast with confessional memoirs in which the ethnographer becomes a superhero (with legendary linguistic and interactional skills) or else a slapstick antihero (stumbling through field research), narrative ethnographies focus not only on the ethnographer's Self but also on ethnographic Others and the precise nature of the interaction between Self and Other.
In addition to showing how to protect hosts from tourists, comparing different ethnographies can help isolate tourism systems that can complement, rather than modify, existing cultures.
Bentley argues that the novels of Hawthorne, James, and Wharton employed strategies akin to the contemporaneous ethnographies of Tylor, Boas, and Malinowski, for example, to chart and defuse the dangerous thrills of social difference.
Different ethnographies will tell us different kinds of things, as to some extent they always have -- one need only think of Gregory Bateson's Naven (1936) or of James Clifford's recent canonization of Godfrey Lienhardt (whose work already demonstrated many of the features which the postmodernist enterprise now discovers to be essential) to know this.
Current critiques of ethnographies call for greater inclusion of direct quotes from those whose actions, perceptions, etc., are represented by the researcher.
Thornhill tracked information on mating and marriage rules in the ethnographies of 129 societies -- from the 16th-century Incas to the 20th-century Vietnamese -- stored at the Human Relations Area Files in New Haven, Conn., a research arm of Yale University.
On the acknowledged level of meaning: Geertz intends Works and Lives to stand as an embodiment of the utility of considering ethnographies as literary texts.