ethnic group

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eth·nic group

(eth'nik grūp),
A social group characterized by a distinctive social and cultural tradition maintained from generation to generation, a common history and origin, and a sense of identification with the group; members have distinctive features in their way of life, shared experiences, and often a common genetic heritage; these features may be reflected in their experience of health and disease.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

ethnic group

Social medicine A group whose members (1) have a sense of common origins; (2) claim a common and distinctive Hx and destiny; (3) possess one or more dimensions of collective cultural individuality; (4) have a sense of unique collective solidarity. See Cultural awareness, Race.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

eth·nic group

(eth'nik grūp)
A social group characterized by a distinctive social and cultural tradition maintained from generation to generation, a common history and origin, and a sense of identification with the group.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

eth·nic group

(eth'nik grūp)
Social group characterized by distinctive social and cultural tradition maintained from generation to generation, common history and origin, and sense of identification with group; may be reflected in experience of health and disease.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Several studies have linked ethnic identity to vocational attitudes and behaviors among Asian American students.
As the media prominently covered Lin and his ethnic identity, for better or for worse, Lin's image presents researchers with the opportunity to explore the role that bi-ethnicity plays in advertising appeal.
In the opinion of Adebola, the cause of ethnic identity in Nigeria can be seen under the remote cause which is a link to the immediate causes.
Two well-known correlates of ethnic identity formation are the family, specifically parents (Kerwin et al., 1993; Rockquemore & Brunsma, 2004; Wardle, 1987) and peers (Phinney, Romero, Nava, and Ffuang, 2001).
They must learn the social categories in which host society divides people regarding ethnic identity, and at the same time, they need to figure out where they fit.
Secondly, the representation of ethnic identity is an ethical gesture.
In Sarawak, it is easier to trace ethnic identity change over time as it holds only two elections: state and national.
Ethnic identity refers to a person's sense of belonging to a particular ethnic community (Phinney 1990).
Are there significant relationships among bullying behaviors, victimization experiences, ethnic identity, and subjective well-being?
Hong Kong, a former British colony, makes an interesting case for studies on ethnic identity in schooling context because of its culturally diverse landscape.
The theory of ethnic identity is central to this research.

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