ethics

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ethics

 [eth´iks]
1. a branch of philosophy dealing with values pertaining to human conduct, considering the rightness and wrongness of actions and the goodness or badness of the motives and ends of such actions.
2. systematic rules or principles governing right conduct. Each practitioner, upon entering a profession, is invested with the responsibility to adhere to the standards of ethical practice and conduct set by the profession. adj., adj eth´ical.
applied ethics practical ethics.
descriptive ethics a type of nonnormative ethics that simply reports what people believe, how they reason, and how they act.
medical ethics the values and guidelines governing decisions in medical practice.
nonnormative ethics ethics whose objective is to establish what factually or conceptually is the case, not what ethically ought to be the case. Two types are descriptive ethics and metaethics.
normative ethics an approach to ethics that works from standards of right or good action. There are three types of normative theories: virtue theories, deontological theories, and teleological theories.
nursing ethics the values and ethical principles governing nursing practice, conduct, and relationships. The Code for Nurses, adopted by the American Nurses' Association (ANA) in 1950 and revised periodically, is intended to provide definite standards of practice and conduct that are essential to the ethical discharge of the nurse's responsibility. Further information on the Code, interpretative statements that clarify it, and guidance in implementing it in specific situations can be obtained from committees and councils on nursing practice of State Nurses' Associations or from the ANA Nursing Practice Department.
practical ethics the attempt to work out the implications of general theories for specific forms of conduct and moral judgment; formerly called applied ethics.
professional ethics the ethical norms, values, and principles that guide a profession and the ethics of decisions made within the profession.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

eth·ics

(eth'iks),
The branch of philosophy that deals with the distinction between right and wrong, with the moral consequences of human actions.
[G. ethikos, arising from custom, fr. ethos, custom]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

ethics

(1) The study of fundamental principles which define values and determine moral duties and obligations.
 
(2) Moral codes of practice concerned with: behaviour (moral conduct)—e. g. unprofessional behaviour, such as direct discrimination; legal, religious, social and personal concerns (moral issues); and debates within society—e.g. euthanasia vs. prolonging the life of a terminally-ill person.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

eth·ics

(eth'iks)
1. The branch of philosophy that deals with the distinction between right and wrong, with the moral consequences of human actions.
2. nursing Philosophy or code about what is ideal in human character and conduct; principles of right or wrong accepted by individual or group; study of morals and moral choices.
[G. ethikos, arising from custom, fr. ethos, custom]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

eth·ics

(eth'iks)
The branch of philosophy that deals with the distinction between right and wrong and with the moral consequences of human actions.
[G. ethikos, arising from custom, fr. ethos, custom]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012

Patient discussion about ethics

Q. The cobbler's shoes are never fixed A bit philosophical/ethical question: do you think it’s a appropriate to an alternative therapist to treat people with disease he or she has and can’t cure himself?

A. Even dietitian can suffer from depression and eat too much, or a gym coach that suffers from injury that prevents him or her from exercising. The knowledge and capabilities are not dependent on the specific situation of the therapist, not to mention the many explanations for such cases.

However, I do agree it may seem a bit suspicious…

More discussions about ethics
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References in periodicals archive ?
Much less are they ordered as a set of principles such as is implied by the modern idea of an ethical system.
Based on the above-mentioned code, only having faith in God and accepting a firm ethical system can make humans' life filled with the sublime concepts and humans' noble values and prevent disturbance and shakiness of humans' values.
If performative contradiction is a valid argumentative strategy, then libertarianism appears to be the only ethical system which can be defended though argumentation.
By definition, we can't know the answers to the questions of faith, but for nearly 20 years, Judaism has been the moral, festive, and poetic structure for my family, and I appreciate its celebrations and beauty as much as the ethical system that first drew me.
The phrasing suggests that supplication and forgiveness are part of an ethical system distinct from and, indeed, superior to the legal system.
Ethical systems appear to be an evolutionary mechanism for coordinating human behavior for collective survival, and it is through ethical systems that traditional societies internalize imperatives toward self-limitation.
In the first ethical system a good end does not justify a bad means.
An ethical system of performance measurement should promote high-quality care by rewarding teamwork in such situations.
While acknowledging that compliance-based ethics programs (of which codes are an obvious example) will be a necessary component of any ethical system, she argues (p.
On the contrary, for Cefalu, Sidney's Arcadia exposes not only the limitations of an early English Reformation ethics, which he argues did not emphasize the reflexive role of conscience, but also the impracticability of "a number of alternative classical and theological ethical options, including Aristotelian behaviorism, an ethical system of guilt and conscience, and a purely Christological ethics of grace" (8).
Many school leaders may assume that their own personal backgrounds have prepared them for handling ethical situations, but Rebore goes on to point out that an effective personal/professional ethical system is not acquired without working at understanding the array of possibilities.
We have here a male narrator who seeks the approval of many men (and of the two women he is involved with), who is interested in how the various men and cultures he knows handle religious, sexual, hunting, drinking, and eating matters, and who needs (desperately, it seems to me) to construct some universal, comprehensive ethical system in which "everything will be all right"--more about this later--no matter from what religious or cultural angle his own behavior is examined.