ethics

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Related to Ethical standard: Ethical Practices

ethics

 [eth´iks]
1. a branch of philosophy dealing with values pertaining to human conduct, considering the rightness and wrongness of actions and the goodness or badness of the motives and ends of such actions.
2. systematic rules or principles governing right conduct. Each practitioner, upon entering a profession, is invested with the responsibility to adhere to the standards of ethical practice and conduct set by the profession. adj., adj eth´ical.
applied ethics practical ethics.
descriptive ethics a type of nonnormative ethics that simply reports what people believe, how they reason, and how they act.
medical ethics the values and guidelines governing decisions in medical practice.
nonnormative ethics ethics whose objective is to establish what factually or conceptually is the case, not what ethically ought to be the case. Two types are descriptive ethics and metaethics.
normative ethics an approach to ethics that works from standards of right or good action. There are three types of normative theories: virtue theories, deontological theories, and teleological theories.
nursing ethics the values and ethical principles governing nursing practice, conduct, and relationships. The Code for Nurses, adopted by the American Nurses' Association (ANA) in 1950 and revised periodically, is intended to provide definite standards of practice and conduct that are essential to the ethical discharge of the nurse's responsibility. Further information on the Code, interpretative statements that clarify it, and guidance in implementing it in specific situations can be obtained from committees and councils on nursing practice of State Nurses' Associations or from the ANA Nursing Practice Department.
practical ethics the attempt to work out the implications of general theories for specific forms of conduct and moral judgment; formerly called applied ethics.
professional ethics the ethical norms, values, and principles that guide a profession and the ethics of decisions made within the profession.

eth·ics

(eth'iks),
The branch of philosophy that deals with the distinction between right and wrong, with the moral consequences of human actions.
[G. ethikos, arising from custom, fr. ethos, custom]

ethics

(1) The study of fundamental principles which define values and determine moral duties and obligations.
 
(2) Moral codes of practice concerned with: behaviour (moral conduct)—e. g. unprofessional behaviour, such as direct discrimination; legal, religious, social and personal concerns (moral issues); and debates within society—e.g. euthanasia vs. prolonging the life of a terminally-ill person.

eth·ics

(eth'iks)
1. The branch of philosophy that deals with the distinction between right and wrong, with the moral consequences of human actions.
2. nursing Philosophy or code about what is ideal in human character and conduct; principles of right or wrong accepted by individual or group; study of morals and moral choices.
[G. ethikos, arising from custom, fr. ethos, custom]

eth·ics

(eth'iks)
The branch of philosophy that deals with the distinction between right and wrong and with the moral consequences of human actions.
[G. ethikos, arising from custom, fr. ethos, custom]

Patient discussion about ethics

Q. The cobbler's shoes are never fixed A bit philosophical/ethical question: do you think it’s a appropriate to an alternative therapist to treat people with disease he or she has and can’t cure himself?

A. Even dietitian can suffer from depression and eat too much, or a gym coach that suffers from injury that prevents him or her from exercising. The knowledge and capabilities are not dependent on the specific situation of the therapist, not to mention the many explanations for such cases.

However, I do agree it may seem a bit suspicious…

More discussions about ethics
References in periodicals archive ?
In the counseling profession, ethical standards are required to protect clients, guide professional behavior, ensure the autonomy of professionals, increase the status of the profession, enhance the client's and the community's trust in the profession, and articulate collegial conduct between professionals (Beauchamp & Childress, 2001).
based on these arguments, we next review two widely recognized approaches to cross-cultural analysis and draw connections between particular cultural attributes and the factors in the model (institutional, organizational, personal) that influence the formation of ethical standards.
Rank-and-file Republicans are nearly three times more likely to say Reagan had higher ethical standards than Trump.
4-11 poll rated six professions a: "high" or "very high" for honesty and ethical standards. In addition to nurses, that list includes military officers, grade school teachers, medical doctors, police officer and pharmacists.
Although 91 per cent of survey respondents placed equal importance on ethical behaviour and financial success, more than half (53 per cent) think career progression at their firm would be difficult without being "flexible" on ethical standards, and just 37 per cent believe that their firm's financials would improve if the ethical conduct of employees improved.
Because ethical standards are not always clear and since there is typically conflicting information communicated in organizations, one would assume that this would be taken into account when leaders determine the severity of consequences for "bad" behavior.
To learn more about ethical standards in business and speaking engagements contact Dr.
Ethical standards were rated on a four-step scale, 'excellent', 'good', 'not good' and 'poor,' Politico reports.
Ethical practice resides at the core of the teaching profession in Ontario, Canada, and is based on an agreed-upon set of ethical standards and principles by both the teaching profession and the public.
The civil society of Kyrgyzstan is ready to assist the Parliament, if deputies create ethical standards, said head of the legal firm "Adilet" Cholpon Dhzakupova at the enlarged session of the coalition of women wings of political parties on July 3, 2012.
" For example, 46 per cent [ of the Indian respondents] feel pressured to compromise on ethical standards in relation to meeting deadlines." Harding urged Indian companies should be " reactive to such problems, and hire individuals based on their strength and morals".
1 Gallup poll, finds Americans rating the honesty and ethical standards of 3 medical professions--nurses, pharmacists, and doctors--the highest of the 21 professions tested werenurses.