ethics

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ethics

 [eth´iks]
1. a branch of philosophy dealing with values pertaining to human conduct, considering the rightness and wrongness of actions and the goodness or badness of the motives and ends of such actions.
2. systematic rules or principles governing right conduct. Each practitioner, upon entering a profession, is invested with the responsibility to adhere to the standards of ethical practice and conduct set by the profession. adj., adj eth´ical.
applied ethics practical ethics.
descriptive ethics a type of nonnormative ethics that simply reports what people believe, how they reason, and how they act.
medical ethics the values and guidelines governing decisions in medical practice.
nonnormative ethics ethics whose objective is to establish what factually or conceptually is the case, not what ethically ought to be the case. Two types are descriptive ethics and metaethics.
normative ethics an approach to ethics that works from standards of right or good action. There are three types of normative theories: virtue theories, deontological theories, and teleological theories.
nursing ethics the values and ethical principles governing nursing practice, conduct, and relationships. The Code for Nurses, adopted by the American Nurses' Association (ANA) in 1950 and revised periodically, is intended to provide definite standards of practice and conduct that are essential to the ethical discharge of the nurse's responsibility. Further information on the Code, interpretative statements that clarify it, and guidance in implementing it in specific situations can be obtained from committees and councils on nursing practice of State Nurses' Associations or from the ANA Nursing Practice Department.
practical ethics the attempt to work out the implications of general theories for specific forms of conduct and moral judgment; formerly called applied ethics.
professional ethics the ethical norms, values, and principles that guide a profession and the ethics of decisions made within the profession.

eth·ics

(eth'iks),
The branch of philosophy that deals with the distinction between right and wrong, with the moral consequences of human actions.
[G. ethikos, arising from custom, fr. ethos, custom]

ethics

[eth′iks]
Etymology: Gk, ethikos, moral duty
the science or study of moral values or principles, including ideals of autonomy, beneficence, and justice. ethical, adj.

ethics

(1) The study of fundamental principles which define values and determine moral duties and obligations.
 
(2) Moral codes of practice concerned with: behaviour (moral conduct)—e. g. unprofessional behaviour, such as direct discrimination; legal, religious, social and personal concerns (moral issues); and debates within society—e.g. euthanasia vs. prolonging the life of a terminally-ill person.

eth·ics

(eth'iks)
1. The branch of philosophy that deals with the distinction between right and wrong, with the moral consequences of human actions.
2. nursing Philosophy or code about what is ideal in human character and conduct; principles of right or wrong accepted by individual or group; study of morals and moral choices.
[G. ethikos, arising from custom, fr. ethos, custom]

ethics (eˑ·thiks),

n the standards of conduct that direct a group or indi-vidual. In particular, it relates to the appropriate use of the power held by a group or individual.

eth·ics

(eth'iks)
The branch of philosophy that deals with the distinction between right and wrong and with the moral consequences of human actions.
[G. ethikos, arising from custom, fr. ethos, custom]

ethics

rules or principles which govern right conduct. Each practitioner, upon entering a profession, is invested with the responsibility to adhere to the standards of ethical practice and conduct set by the profession.

code of ethics
the written rules of ethics.
veterinary ethics
the values and guidelines governing decisions in veterinary practice.

Patient discussion about ethics

Q. The cobbler's shoes are never fixed A bit philosophical/ethical question: do you think it’s a appropriate to an alternative therapist to treat people with disease he or she has and can’t cure himself?

A. Even dietitian can suffer from depression and eat too much, or a gym coach that suffers from injury that prevents him or her from exercising. The knowledge and capabilities are not dependent on the specific situation of the therapist, not to mention the many explanations for such cases.

However, I do agree it may seem a bit suspicious…

More discussions about ethics
References in periodicals archive ?
In this article, the author shares the process and outcomes of Ontario's dialogic approach to identifying ethical standards and principles as part of the evolution of a framework for educators' ethical practice.
Ethical practice breaks down at the intersection of "thou shalt" and Bentham and Mill's consequential framework.
It would be incorrect to assume that the findings in this report present conclusive evidence of the ethical practices and priorities of all small firms.
Responses to the survey indicate that although a growing number of organizations in both the private and the public sectors have been implementing initiatives to promote ethical practice in the past few years, ethics is not a priority," concludes Girards.
HE Jawaan Awaidha Suhail Al Khaili, Chairman of ADIB said, "ADIB is committed to develop Islamic finance in the region and a large part of what we do is based on following best ethical practices.
India) introduce 21 chapters presenting international perspectives on the experiences of faculty, administrators, librarians, and researchers worldwide regarding ethical practices in a field where there is no official body overseeing such standards.
Prassas also zeroed in on the importance of ethical practices, recognizing the Chilean organization's initiative to adopt a code of ethics.
Coverage includes clinical methods of treatment, mandatory rules and regulations in clinical practicum, and guidelines for student clinicians' relationships with clinical supervisors, as well as ethical practices, conduct, behavior, and competencies required for clinical work.
Although this may seem obvious, few people actually take the time to consciously examine their personal values, since they presume that ethical practices will somehow flow simply from knowing the rules.
Good ethical practices have become part of the new culture at Adelphia.
IS urges all nonprofit and philanthropic organizations to adopt a code of ethical practices, conduct an annual ethics audit, abide by a set of standards, and involve their constituencies in these processes.