ether

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ether

 [e´ther]
1. an organic compound containing an oxygen atom bonded to two carbon atoms.
2. diethyl or ethyl ether: a colorless, transparent, mobile, very volatile, highly flammable liquid with a characteristic odor; it was the first inhalational anesthetic used for surgical anesthesia, but is now rarely used in the United States or Canada because of its flammability.

e·ther

(ē'thĕr),
1. Any organic compound in which two carbon atoms are independently linked to a common oxygen atom, thus containing the group -C-O-C-.
See also: epoxy.
2. Loosely used to refer to diethyl ether or an anesthetic ether, although a large number of ethers have anesthetic properties. For individual ethers, see the specific name.
[G. aithēr, the pure upper air]

ether

(e´ther)
1. an organic compound having an oxygen atom bonded to two carbon atoms; R–O–R′.
2. C2H5OC2H5(diethyl or ethyl e.); the first inhalational anesthetic used for surgical anesthesia, now little used because of its flammability.

ether

(ē′thər)
n.
1. Any of a class of organic compounds in which two hydrocarbon groups are linked by an oxygen atom.
2. A volatile, highly flammable liquid, C4H10O, derived from distilling ethyl alcohol with sulfuric acid, used as a reagent and solvent, and formerly used as an anesthetic. Also called diethyl ether, ethyl ether.
3. The regions of space beyond the earth's atmosphere; the heavens.
4. The element believed in ancient and medieval civilizations to fill all space above the sphere of the moon and to compose the stars and planets.
5. Physics An all-pervading, infinitely elastic, massless medium formerly postulated as the medium of propagation of electromagnetic waves.

e·ther′ic (ĭ-thĕr′ĭk, ĭ-thîr′-) adj.

ether

[ē′thər]
Etymology: Gk, aither, air
1 any of a class of organic compounds in which two hydrocarbon groups are linked by an oxygen atom.
2 a nonhalogenated volatile liquid no longer used in clinical practice as a general anesthetic. Also called diethyl ether, ethyl oxide.

e·ther

(ē'thĕr)
1. Any organic compound in which two carbon atoms are independently linked to a common oxygen atom, thus containing the group -C-O-C-.
See also: epoxy
2. Loosely used to refer to diethyl ether.
[G. aithēr, the pure upper air]

ether

A volatile and highly inflammable liquid once widely used as a safe and effective drug for the induction and continuance of general anaesthesia. Induction is slow and unpleasant and deep anaesthesia is needed for muscle relaxation. Postoperative nausea is common. Because of these disadvantages and the danger of explosion, ether is now seldom used. The drug is, however, on the WHO official list.

ether

a general term for a group of anaesthesia-inducing volatile compounds

ether (ēˑ·thr),

n organic compound with molecule containing oxygen atom bonded to two hydrocarbon chains; insoluble in water but soluble in organic solvents such as ether and alcohol. Used as an early anaesthetic.

e·ther

(ē'thĕr)
Any organic compound in which two carbon atoms are independently linked to a common oxygen atom, but commonly used to refer to diethyl ether or an anesthetic ether, although a large number of ethers have anesthetic properties.
[G. aithēr, the pure upper air]

ether

1. diethyl ether: a colorless, transparent, very volatile, highly inflammable liquid with a characteristic odor; given by inhalation to produce general anesthesia.
2. any organic compound containing an oxygen atom bonded to two carbon atoms.

spiritus ether nit
used as a stimulant for depressed animals, both as an inhalant and in oral drenches.
vinyl ether
a clear colorless liquid used as an inhalation anesthetic.
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