Estrogen


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to Estrogen: progesterone

estrogen

 [es´tro-jen]
a generic term for any of the estrus-producing compounds (female sex hormones), including estradiol, estriol, and estrone. Called also estrogenic hormone. In humans, the estrogens are formed in the ovary, adrenal cortex, testis, and fetoplacental unit, and are responsible for female secondary sex characteristic development, and during the menstrual cycle, act on the female genitalia to produce an environment suitable for fertilization, implantation, and nutrition of the early embryo. Uses for estrogens include oral contraceptives, hormone replacement therapy, advanced prostate or postmenopausal breast carcinoma treatment, and osteoporosis prophylaxis.
conjugated e's a mixture of the sodium salts of the sulfate esters of estrone and equilin; therapeutic uses are similar to those of other estrogens; administered orally, intravenously, intramuscularly, or intravaginally.
esterified e's a mixture of esters of estrogenic substances, principally estrone, having therapeutic uses similar to those of other estrogens.

es·tro·gen

(es'trō-jen),
Generic term for any substance, natural or synthetic, that exerts biologic effects characteristic of estrogenic hormones such as 17β-estradiol. Estrogens are formed by the ovary, placenta, testes, and possibly the adrenal cortex, as well as by certain plants; they stimulate secondary sexual characteristics, and exert systemic effects, such as growth and maturation of long bones, and are used therapeutically in any disorder attributable to estrogen deficiency or amenable to estrogen therapy, such as menstrual disorders and menopausal problems. They control the course of the menstrual cycle.
Synonym(s): estrin, oestrogen
[G. oistrus, -heat, estrus, + -gen, producing]

estrogen

also

oestrogen

(ĕs′trə-jən)
n.
1. Any of several steroid hormones, such as estradiol and estrone, that are produced primarily by the ovaries, stimulate the development and maintenance of female secondary sex characteristics, exert systemic effects such as the growth and maturation of long bones, and promote estrus in many female mammals. Estrogens synthesized from plant sources or obtained from horses are used as drugs, primarily to treat estrogen deficiency.
2. Any of several synthetic compounds that mimic the physiologic activity of estrogen, such as ethinyl estradiol, used primarily in oral contraceptives.

es′tro·gen′ic (-jĕn′ĭk) adj.
es′tro·gen′i·cal·ly adv.

estrogen

American spelling of oestrogen.

Pronunciation
Medspeak-UK: pronounced, EE stoh gen
Medspeak-US: pronounced, ESS troh gen

estrogen

Any of the estrus-related steroids, which include estradiol, estriol, estrone Site of production Ovaries, adrenal cortex, adipose tissue, in the fetus, placenta; estrogen is responsible for the 2º ♀ sex characteristics, and, during the menstrual cycle, prepares the endometrium for implantation ↑ in Ovarian tumors, adrenal feminizing tumors, some adrenal and testicular tumors, precocious puberty, gynecomastia ↓ in OCs, ovarian failure. See Designer estrogen, Estradiol, Estriol, Estrone, Estrus, Hormonal replacement therapy, Oral contraceptive, Phytoestrogen, Progesterone.

es·tro·gen

(es'trŏ-jen)
Generic term for any substance, natural or synthetic, which exerts biologic effects characteristic of estrogenic hormones; formed by the ovary, placenta, testes, and possibly the cortex of the suprarenal gland, as well as by some plants; stimulates secondary sexual characteristics and exerts systemic effects, such as growth and maturation of long bones; until recently, given after menopause or oophorectomy to prevent heart attack and prevent osteoporosis; also used to prevent or stop lactation, suppress ovulation, and palliate carcinoma of the breast and prostate.
Synonym(s): oestrogen.
[G. oistrus, -heat, estrus, + -gen, producing]

estrogen

see OESTROGEN.

Estrogen

Female hormone produced by the ovaries and released by the follicles as they mature. Responsible for female sexual characteristics, estrogen stimulates and triggers a response from at least 300 tissues, and may help some types of breast cancer to grow. After menopause, the production of the hormone gradually stops.

es·tro·gen

(es'trŏ-jen)
Generic term for any substance, natural or synthetic, which exerts biologic effects characteristic of estrogenic hormones; formed by the ovary, placenta, testes, and possibly the cortex of the suprarenal gland, as well as by some plants; stimulates secondary sexual characteristics and exerts systemic effects, such as growth and maturation of long bones; also used to prevent or stop lactation, suppress ovulation, and palliate carcinoma of the breast and prostate.
Synonym(s): oestrogen.
[G. oistrus, -heat, estrus, + -gen, producing]
References in periodicals archive ?
Estrogen is one of the important female steroid sex hormones.
In rats that had their ovaries removed, DHED led to a measurable increase of estrogen in the brain but not in the uterus or bloodstream, Prokai and colleagues report.
In preclinical studies, investigators found evidence to support bazedoxifene as the SERM of choice and demonstrated that, by combining it with conjugated estrogens, they could provide an optimal balance of estrogen-receptor agonist/antagonist activity, compared with other potential TSEC pairings.
Three hundred thirty-three (53%) women were on estrogen treatment at the time of their VTE.
The study could lead to hormonal replacement therapies in which estrogen is delivered to specific parts of the brain that regulate body weight, thereby avoiding the risks associated with full-body estrogen delivery, such as breast cancer and stroke.
To find out, we first have to measure how much of each type of estrogen is in the bay.
Because of the success of breast cancer treatments with drugs that act on the estrogen receptor, it was only natural to think of ER-B as a potential treatment target, especially with its expression in many more cancer types that were traditionally thought of as being negative for ER.
Avoid xenoestrogens: These are foreign, often man- made substances that mimic the behaviour of estrogen in the body.
Increasing progesterone levels is the other part of the solution to estrogen dominance.
Excess weight may increase the risk of breast cancer by boosting estrogen levels.
-- In retrospect, perhaps the most startling thing about the hormone therapy study of the Women's Health Initiative was how wrong most experts had been beforehand about the benefits of estrogen in postmenopausal women.