Essiac

Essiac

A tea containing anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and immunostimulatory chemicals; it has been promoted as a treatment for cancer but has not been scientifically studied. Essiac was first used in the 1920s. Trials of its usefulness have not shown any evidence of efficacy; it is not approved for use in the U.S. by the Food and Drug Administration.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
However, oncologists have recommended against using slippery elm bark, in the form of Essiac (Essiac Canada International, Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada), because it lacks efficacy and may delay beneficial medical treatment if patients rely on it to the exclusion of proven allopathic treatments.
ESSIAC: A herbal mix originally from Canada and sold as the "medicine man's cancer cure".
A large number of herbal remedies (e.g., garlic, mistletoe, Essiac, Lingzhi (mushrooms of the genus Ganoderma), and Astragalus (Astragalus membranaceus; Huang Qi)) are used by patients with cancer, including BC, for treating the cancer and/or reducing the toxicities of chemotherapeutic drugs.
19 Herbal Tea with Milk Thistle (Essiac), twice daily.
She began taking Essiac, a treatment made up of four herbs and, combined with the food from her own garden.
She took some Vitamin C and DMSO (possibly six times), and also added some CoQ10, selenium and took four ounces of Essiac tea three times a day.
The products contain ingredients such as bloodroot, shark cartilage, coral calcium, cesium, ellagic acid, Cat's Claw, an herbal tea called Essiac, and mushroom varieties such as Agaricus Blazeii, Shitake, Maitake, and Reishi.
"I took Essiac tincture and vitamin B17, which is said to break down tumours.
INVESTIGATIONS OF ANTI-CANCER COMPOUNDS FROM ESSIAC EXTRACT.
Caisse to treat patients at his clinic in Cambridge, Mass., and sought to interest scientists from Sloan-Kettering Institute in New York and from the National Cancer Institute in researching Essiac. That effort failed when she again refused to allow the formula to be shared with others.
Brusch permitted her to treat patients at his clinic in Cambridge, Mass., and sought to interest scientists from Sloan-Kettering Institute in New York and from the National Cancer Institute in researching Essiac. That effort failed when she again refused to allow the formula to be shared with others.
After documenting many probable, provable, and preventable causes of dastardly disease in precious pets, Straw discusses conventional treatments, gives insights into pet insurance and PPOs, and introduces alternative therapies including Bach flower remedies such as wild rose, water violet, olive, and clematis, to name a few, and herbs such as artemisinin, Essiac, garlic, Hoxsey treatment, milk thistle, and golden seal.