Inuit

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Inuit

(ĭn′ū-ĭt) [Eskimo people]
People native to Arctic America.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Lewis Bay 1719 Camerlique Camerlengo 0 Brador 1765 Segullia Segura 3 Chateau Bay 1783 Marro Mario 2 Ikkerasak 1786 Paulo Paulo 33 Cape Charles 1786 Eketcheak Eketxeak/ 0 Isthmus Bay Egetxeak 1798 Pompey Pompey 1 Battle Harbour 1827 Molina Molina 1 Esquimaux Bay 1836 Usanga Uzcanga 6 Aivertok * Number of repeats with similar or identical spellings held within the total of the 641 records in the database.
As the Athenaeum reported "from the highest official authority" on 27 November 1847, for instance, British searching expeditions were specifically instructed to "communicate with the various tribes of Esquimaux, in expectation of gleaning some tidings of the discovery ships," and it was tacitly acknowledged in searchers' instructions that travelling Inuits were the most likely of any parties to offer guidance to the searches (1220).
(4) To name just a few: A Peep at the Esquimaux (1825), Typee: A
(54) Five days later Peter Michand, Peter Deer, and Charles Duke of Hyde Park incorporated the Esquimaux Exhibition Company in Springfield, Illinois, with Justice Porter acting as the largest stockholder.
Both in Govier's fiction and in Audubon's biographical notes, we see that Audubon temporarily becomes unable to draw birds, the loon, the Esquimaux curlew: "they are difficult to imitate or represent" (1986 I: 393-394, 422), he says.
But occasionally it is a shame not to be informed about an obscure book's content, as when Gerson regrets the dearth of information available about the author of A Peep at the Esquimaux (1825), a book of poetry for young readers by "A Lady." A few sentences or more on the book itself--and the same is true for other titles--would have been welcome.
Alaska's earliest newspapers--with names like The Esquimaux, The Alaskan, The Sitka Post, The Alaska Appeal and The Alaska Times--were owned and operated by businessmen, miners, military men, several governors and missionaries.
I impute it, though, to their naturally unctuous natures, being rendered still more unctuous by the nature of their vocation, and especially by their pursuing their game in those frigid Polar Seas, on the very coasts of that Esquimaux country where the convivial natives pledge each other in bumpers of train oil.