escape response

(redirected from Escape behavior)

escape response

any flight reaction elicited in an animal as a result of a threat.
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Their collaborative publication, Drosophila melanogaster foraging regulates a nociceptive-like escape behavior through a developmentally plastic sensory circuit, can be read online at the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America.
Studies in the field of Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) have identified challenging behaviors in educational situations as task avoidance or escape behavior prompted by an aversive task stimuli, such as the pace or complexity of task demands (Haring & Kennedy, 1990; Ingvarsson, Hanley, & Welter, 2009; Iwata, 1987; Mace & Belfiore, 1990; Repp, Felce, & Barton, 1988; Weeks & Gaylord-Ross, 1981).
Therefore, we hypothesized that visual cues may play an important role in regulating social interactions, and disruption of proper visual information in TLN fish may account for social instability and disruption in swimming and escape behavior patterns.
Crowd motion patterns or features extraction for escape behavior characterization have attracted considerable interest, which is very likely to improve the performance of anomaly detection.
Hence, these two processes are the focus of our analysis and their state changes can be used to analyze the VM escape behavior. During the analysis for VENOM vulnerability, we found that a new terminal process with root authority is started after a successful suspicious VM escape to the host machine using VENOM.
Layng (2006, 2009), drawing upon analyses developed by Goldiamond (1974, 1979), has made a distinction between emotions as descriptions of contingencies involving special motivational components (e.g., fear as a description of contingencies in which escape behavior is motivated; anger as descriptions of contingencies in which aggressive behavior is motivated) and emotional behavior as behavior that may have originally had an emotional motivational component but subsequently comes under the control of different social contingencies (e.g., aggressive behavior maintained by positive reinforcement in the form of attention or access to tangible items).
Whether late returns to the session from a break are deemed "escape behavior" or something else, the accumulated time absent can simply be subtracted from the next break period or the time at which the member departs from the end of the session after the rest of the group.
The book also takes up the question of how a species with no obvious defensive or escape behavior has survived so well for so long.
In contrast, in the saline solution control group, 7 of 9 birds were rated difficult to capture and displayed normal escape behavior. In midazolam-treated birds, defensive and escape behaviors were significantly reduced, and the overall ease of capture was significantly increased (P < .01).
The extinction of operant classes of escape behavior may best explain the results of Wortman and Breham (1975) who found in some helplessness experiments that participant behavior for escape was facilitated.