erythropoiesis

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erythropoiesis

 [ĕ-rith″ro-poi-e´sis]
the formation of erythrocytes; called also erythrogenesis. adj., adj erythropoiet´ic.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

e·ryth·ro·poi·e·sis

(ĕ-rith'rō-poy-ē'sis),
The formation of red blood cells.
Synonym(s): erythrocytopoiesis
[erythrocyte + G. poiēsis, a making]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

erythropoiesis

(ĭ-rĭth′rō-poi-ē′sĭs)
n.
The formation or production of red blood cells.

e·ryth′ro·poi·et′ic (-ĕt′ĭk) adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

e·ryth·ro·poi·e·sis

(ĕ-rith'rō-poy-ē'sis)
The formation of red blood cells.
[erythrocyte + G. poiēsis, a making]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

erythropoiesis

Red cell production.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

erythropoiesis

the formation of blood cells in bone marrow.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

Erythropoiesis

The process through which new red blood cells are created; it begins in the bone marrow.
Mentioned in: Porphyrias
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

e·ryth·ro·poi·e·sis

(ĕ-rith'rō-poy-ē'sis)
Formation of red blood cells.
[erythrocyte + G. poiēsis, a making]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Intermittent hypobaric hypoxia stimulates erythropoesis and improves aerobic capacity.
Due to suppression of erythropoesis: The histopathological study of the bone marrow of children with malarial anaemia shows impaired bone marrow response (13-15), erythroid hyperplasia, with dyserythropoiesis, cytoplasmic and nuclear bridging, and irregular nuclear outline (16).
It revealed increased erythropoesis, but no changes indicative of a hematological malignancy.
The pathophysiology of hemolytic anemia involves the destruction of erthythrocytes and the subsequent acceleration of erythropoesis. Hemolytic anemia may be inherited or acquired.
(14) Previously, in PPA IV FCM has shown significant increase in serum ferritin levels than with ferrous sulphate (p value<0.0001) indicating a successful repletion of iron stores and accessibility for erythropoesis. (11)