erythroblast

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erythroblast

 [ĕ-rith´ro-blast]
a term originally used for any type of nucleated erythrocyte, but now usually limited to one of the nucleated precursors of an erythrocyte, i.e. one of the developmental stages in the erythrocytic series, in contrast to a megaloblast. In this usage, it is called also normoblast.
basophilic erythroblast a nucleated precursor in the erythrocytic series, preceding the polychromatophilic erythroblast and following the proerythroblast; the cytoplasm is basophilic, the nucleus is large with clumped chromatin, and the nucleoli have disappeared. Called also basophilic normoblast.
orthochromatic erythroblast see normoblast.
polychromatic erythroblast (polychromatophilic erythroblast) see normoblast.

e·ryth·ro·blast

(ĕ-rith'rō-blast),
Originally, a term denoting all forms of human red blood cells containing a nucleus, both pathologic (that is, megaloblastic) and normal (for example, normoblastic). The pathologic or megaloblastic series is observed in pernicious anemia in relapse. The term megaloblast is also used to indicate the first generation of cells in the red blood cell series that can be distinguished morphologically; hence, with this usage, megaloblast denotes both a normal and an abnormal cell. In the erythroblastic series of maturation four stages of development can be recognized: 1) proerythroblast, 2) basophilic erythroblast, 3) polychromatic erythroblast, and 4) orthochromatic erythroblast. In the megaloblastic series of maturation, stages similar to those found in the normoblastic series are seen: 1) promegaloblast, 2) basophilic megaloblast, 3) polychromatic megaloblast, and 4) orthochromatic megaloblast. In the normal series of maturation, after loss of the nucleus, young erythrocytes are called reticulocytes; these cells may be recognized with supravital stains such as brilliant cresyl blue; ultimately the reticulocytes become erythrocytes, or mature red blood cells.
Synonym(s): erythrocytoblast
[erythro- + G. blastos, germ]

erythroblast

(ĭ-rĭth′rə-blăst′)
n.
Any of the nucleated cells normally found only in bone marrow that develop into erythrocytes.

e·ryth′ro·blas′tic adj.

e·ryth·ro·blast

(ĕ-rith'rō-blast)
The first generation of cells in the red blood cell series that can be distinguished from precursor endothelial cells. In normal maturation, four stages of development can be recognized: pronormoblast, basophilic normoblast, polychromatic normoblast, and orthochromatic normoblast.
[erythro- + G. blastos, germ]

erythroblast

A primitive, nucleated red blood cell. A stage in the development of the normal non-nucleated red cell (ERYTHROCYTE) found in the circulating blood.

erythroblast

a nucleated cell occurring in bone marrow as the first identifiable stage of red blood cell formation; See ERYTHROCYTE.

Loevit,

Moritz, Austrian pathologist, 1851-1918.
Loevit cell - originally a term denoting all forms of human red blood cells containing a nucleus, both pathologic and normal. Synonym(s): erythroblast

e·ryth·ro·blast

(ĕ-rith'rō-blast)
The first generation of cells in the red blood cell series that can be distinguished from precursor endothelial cells.
[erythro- + G. blastos, germ]
References in periodicals archive ?
We would define a CpG site as hypomethylated in erythroblasts if the methylation density of the CpG site was <20% in the erythroblasts and >80% in other blood cells and tissues and vice versa.
The increased iron levels in the BM of Tfr2 KO animals could trigger EryA erythroblasts production, but the increased apoptosis finally normalizes RBC output.
Transmission electron micrograph showing control mouse fetal liver of the demonstrating the normal appearance of hepatocyte (H), erythroblasts (E) and bile canaliculi (B).
Considering that in cases of severe pancytopenia with increased erythroblasts and cytogenetic abnormalities, using bone marrow biopsy and aspiration may be misleading for megaloblastic anemia because the diagnosis can be confused with acute leukemia [3, 4].
Additionally, inflammatory cytokines induce the production of hepcidine, a peptide generated in the liver, which impairs RBC synthesis by reducing iron availability for the formation of erythroblasts. The third factor responsible for anemia in patients with CKD is a decreased life span of RBCs.
There are three phases in the development of cells in the red-blood-cell/erythrocyte system: production and maturation of erythroblasts and reticulocytes in the bone marrow transport of mature erythrocytes in the circulating blood, and aging as well as elimination of erythrocytes from the blood by mononuclear phagocytes of the spleen.
In [beta]-thalassemia, due to the precipitation of excess [alpha]-globin chains, rapid cellular apoptosis of early erythroblasts and red blood cell membrane damage are well characterized [94-96].
Turnbull, "Onset of cardiac function during early mouse embryogenesis coincides with entry of primitive erythroblasts into the embryo proper," Circulation Research, vol.
LincRNA-EPS was found to be highly induced in terminally differentiating erythroblasts considering the developmental markers CD71 and Ter119.
Kong, "Salidrosidepromotes erythropoiesis and protects erythroblasts against oxidative stress by up-regulating glutathione peroxidase and thioredoxin," Journal of Ethnopharmacology, vol.
Anaemia is promoted by erythropoietin deficiency, shortened existence of red blood cells, death of immature erythroblasts due to the Fas ligand and TRAIL, decreased responsiveness of the erythron to proliferative signals of erythropoietin, and the myelosuppressive effect of the chemotherapy (32), (33).
(13) Transferrin receptors on erythroblasts bind the iron-transferrin complexes, which then undergo endocytosis.