erotophobia

(redirected from Erotophobic)
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erotophobia

 [ĕ-rot″o-fo´be-ah]
fear of love, especially of sexual feelings and activity.

er·o·to·pho·bi·a

(er'ō-tō-fō'bē-ă),
Morbid aversion to the thought of sexual love and to its physical expression.
[G. erōs, love, + phobos, fear]

erotophobia

/ero·to·pho·bia/ (-fo´be-ah) irrational fear of love, especially of sexual feelings and activities.
Morbid fear of sexuality

er·o·to·pho·bi·a

(ĕ-rot'ŏ-fō'bē-ă)
Morbid aversion to the thought of sexual love and to its physical expression.
[G. erōs, love, + phobos, fear]
References in periodicals archive ?
We believe the strength of this relationship supports that our sample of counselors are not erotophobic or emotionally reactive to issues of sexuality.
Being erotophobic or an erotophilic is so important that these categories have been used in scores of sexuality studies, reports Fox News.
A study has found that being erotophobic is linked with the belief in sex myths and the transmission of misinformation to others.
However, Gerrard and Reis (1989) found that erotophobic males in a human reproduction course learned more about AIDS and contraception than did less erotophobic males.
Moreover, testifying to the validity of our coding categories, greater self-reported erotophobic tendencies predicted lower scores on the erotic details and explicit language indices overall, r (87) = -.
Byrne (1977) theorized that frequent pairings of sexuality and negative emotions should produce a generalized affective reaction to sex that is negative--an erotophobic personality.
They see people as either erotophilic (tending to respond to sexual cues with positive affect and evaluations) or erotophobic (tending to respond to sexual cues with negative affect and evaluations).
These erotophillic and erotophobic reactions were less distinguishable, however, when masturbatory behaviour was taken into account.
Hypothesis 6: Individuals scoring at the erotophobic end of the erotophobia-erotophilia scale would be expected to report less certainty about their sexual self-view than would individuals at the erotophilic end of the scale.
Both the SOS and the Revised Mosher Guilt Inventory have been found to be related; erotophilic individuals have relatively low sex guilt and erotophobic individuals have relatively high sex guilt (Fisher et al.
However, the possibility that seroconversion predisposed individuals to become more erotophobic must be viewed in light of the fact that seroconversion failed to predispose seroconverted individuals to learn more about sexuality, which would also have been a reasonable expectation but which, in fact, did not occur.