ergogenic aid

(redirected from Ergogenic aids)

ergogenic aid

A popular term for any device intended to enhance athletic performance, which can be conceptually divided into mechanical, physiological and mental factors.

Ergogenic aids
• Mechanical—Reduced friction, improved aerodynamics, lighter weight, better wicking of perspiration, composite materials that provide better resiliency, etc.
  — Fabrics
  — Equipment
• Physiology
  — Bicarbonates
  — Carbohydrates
  — Phosphates
  — Nutritional supplements
  — Pharmacologic aids
• Mental
  — Counselling
  — Psychological support
  — Personal support (family and friends)
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

er·go·gen·ic aid

(ĕr'gō-jen'ik ād)
Ergogenic aids have been classified as nutritional, pharmacologic, physiologic, or psychological; methods to enhance athletic performance range from use of accepted techniques such as carbohydrate loading to illegal and unsafe approaches such as use of anabolic-androgenic steroids.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

ergogenic aid

In sports medicine, the questionable and often harmful use of various substances to try to enhance performance. Some of these materials, e.g., blood transfusions, anabolic steroids, amphetamines, amino acids, and human growth hormone, are standard medicines approved for uses other than those intended by the athlete. Others are not only not indicated for any illness but may be harmful, esp. when the amount of the active ingredient in the product is unknown. Included in this latter group are cyproheptadine, taken to increase appetite, strength, and, allegedly, testosterone production; ginseng; pangamic acid; octacosanol, a 28-carbon straight-chain alcohol obtained from wheat germ oil, the biological effects of which are unknown; guarana, prepared from the seeds of the Paulliania cupana tree, used for its alleged ability to increase energy; gamma-oryzanol, an isomer of oryzanol extracted from rice bran oil, allegedly useful in decreasing recovery time after exercise; proteolytic enzymes, e.g., chymotrypsin, trypsin-chymotrypsin, and papain, the safety and efficacy of which have not been established, esp. when used with oral anticoagulants or by pregnant or lactating women; and bee pollen, which has shown no evidence of improving athletic performance.
See: anabolic agent; blood doping
See also: aid
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
Also, a large proportion of empirical research and systematic reviews have approached the complex topic of alkalizing ergogenic aids, especially NaHC[O.sub.3] (Close et al., 2016; Siegler et al., 2016; Burke, 2013).
Since ancient times, competitive athletes have been familiar with the use of ergogenic aids, and they will probably continue to use unfair and harmful substances in future because their inclination to victory, along with the mirage of glory and money, will probably overcome health and legal risks.
Oftentimes nutrient supplementation and ergogenic aids (caffeine, sports drinks, or illegal substances) are also consumed regularly to enhance performance during high intensity exercise.
It covers integrated training essentials; the science of human movement; testing in sports performance; flexibility training concepts; metabolic energy system training; core training concepts; balance training concepts; plyometric training concepts; speed, agility, and quickness training; resistance training concepts; Olympic lifting for performance enhancement; the science of periodization and the Optimum Performance Training model; preventing injury to the athlete; performance nutrition; ergogenic aids; and psychology in sports performance.
Prevalence of use of ergogenic aids among strength training apprentices in Joao pessoa.
Dietary Supplements for Exercise and Athletic Performance, covers products -- sometimes called ergogenic aids -- that claim to improve strength or endurance, increase exercise efficiency, achieve a performance goal more quickly, and increase tolerance for more intense training.
(2009) found that runners' performance increased by 6.5%, and that slower runners showed a stronger placebo effect after ingesting purported nutritional ergogenic aids. In another work, the placebo effect of caffeine on resistance exercise to failure was studied with 12 men (Duncan, Lyons, & Hankey, 2009).
The results showed that 65,9% from no users ASA say to know and 96% users to know other users and the consumption of ergogenic aids are very important.
The use of supplements as ergogenic aids is common among endurance athletes.