equivalence

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e·quiv·a·lence

, equivalency (ē-kwiv'ă-lens, -len-sē),
1. The property of an element or radical of combining with or displacing, in definite and fixed proportion, another element or radical in a compound.
2. The point in a precipitin test at which antibody and antigen are present in optimal proportions.
[L. aequus, equal, + valentia, strength (valence)]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

e·quiv·a·lence

, equivalency (ē-kwiv'ă-lĕns, -lĕn-sē)
The property of an element or radical of combining with or displacing, in definite and fixed proportion, another element or radical in a compound.
[L. aequus, equal, + valentia, strength (valence)]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

equivalence

(ē-kwĭv′ă-lĕns) [″ + valere, to be worth]
The quality of being equal in power, potency, force, value, or clinical effectiveness.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
For example, the emergence of two 3-member equivalence classes from an OTM structure involve the training of AB and AC baseline relations via four trial types (A1/[B1.bar]B2 and A1/ [C1.bar]C2 for Class 1; and A2/B1[B2.bar], A2/C1[C2.bar] for Class 2; the underlined stimulus is defined as correct).
According to the authors, when the number of stimuli is small, the additional exposure to baseline trials and/or the placement of training and test trials closely together could induce the acquisition of the untrained simple discriminations, leading to positive outcomes in the test for equivalence class formation (Saunders et al., 1999; Saunders & Green, 1999).
Then a degree k polynomial cofunctor F : O [right arrow] Top is determined (up to equivalence) by its restriction to [O.sub.k].
The lefthand map sends a point e [member of] E to the point (e, [const.sub.p(e)]), where [const.sub.p(e)] denotes the constant path at p(e); this map is a homotopy equivalence. The right-hand map sends a point (e, [phi]) [member of] mps(p) to the point [phi] (1) [member of] B; this map is a fibration.
These researchers attempt to show some of the challenges faced in translation, where the degree of equivalence varies and there is not a complete match with the original words or texts.
Apart from the problems of equivalence, there are also other external translation problems.
If we train four equivalence classes consisting of four members each, such as A1-B1-C1-D1, A2-B2-C2-D2, A3-B3-C3-D3 and A4-B4-C4-D4, the compound stimulus A1B1 maintains an equivalence-equivalence relation with B2C2 because both compounds contain elements belonging to the same class.
When we develop ontology for a course for web semantics we realize that Protege environment does not seem to offer specific and direct help to create equivalence between similar terms of a subject matter.
In comparative quantitative research a large number of different types of equivalences exist.
delay showed a difference in likelihood of equivalence class formation, it did not clarify how delay, in general, would enhance equivalence class formation.
The phenomenon of stimulus equivalence was distinguished from the unidirectional conditional discriminations that could serve as prerequisites for emergent relations, and was further defined and formalized by Sidman & Tailby (1982).