equation of motion

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e·qua·tion of mo·tion

(ĕ-kwā'zhŭn mō'shŭn)
1. An expression of Newton's second law that relates forces, displacements, and their derivatives for a mechanical system.
2. For the respiratory system, an equation that relates the forces involved in breathing to the displacements they produce. Typically, pressure differences are used to represent generalized forces and volume changes are used to represent generalized displacements. The simplest equation of motion written for the lungs states that the change in transpulmonary pressure is equal to the sum of an elastic term plus a flow resistive term: transpulmonary pressure change = elastance × tidal volume + resistance × change in flow.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

equation of motion

A statement of the variables of pressure, volume, compliance, resistance, and flow for respiratory system mechanics.
See also: equation
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
The electronic equations of motion, which are determined by the Euler-Lagrange equations are
Considering the shear deformation and the warping effect, equations of motion for the cantilever plate are derived by using Hamilton's principle.
In case of vanishing pressure and zero cosmological constant, the equations of motion of the density and current are
the discrete equations of motion (13a)-(14b) after suitable rescaling of time and redefinition of the parameter [eta] reduce to
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What remains in the transformed frame is the set of equations of motion:
To obtain equations of motion using the Newton-Euler method, it is required to determine the segments center of mass (COM) and the joint positions from top down.
After the dimensionless transformation, when x < d, the differential equations of motion of the system between two collisions are as follows:
Of course, the influence of the nonlinear damping terms on the resulting equations of motion increases the difficulty of finding their closed-form solutions.
Using the above variables [phi] in Equation (5) and [[phi].sup.*] in Equation (45) one can determine the Poisson bracket and write further the equations of motion of microscopic particles in the form of Hamilton's equations.
"Our paper doesn't try and explain how this could be achieved, just how equations of motion might operate in such regimes," he asserted.