eponym

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eponym

 [ep´o-nim]
a name or phrase formed from or including a person's name, such as Hodgkin's disease, Cowper's glands, or Schick test. adj., adj eponym´ic, epon´ymous.

ep·o·nym

(ep'ō-nim),
The name of a disease, structure, operation, or procedure, usually derived from the name of the person who discovered or described it first.
[G. epōnymos, named after]

eponym

[ep′ənim]
Etymology: Gk, epi, above, onyma, name
a name for a disease, organ, procedure, or body function that is derived from the name of a person, usually a physician or scientist who first identified the condition or devised the object bearing the name. Examples include fallopian tube, Parkinson's disease, and Billing's method.

eponym

Medtalk A syndrome, lesion, surgical procedure or clinical sign that bears the name of the author who first described the entity, or less commonly, the name of the index Pt(s) in whom the lesion was first described

ep·o·nym

(ep'ŏ-nim)
The name of a disease, structure, operation, or procedure, usually derived from the name of the person who first discovered or described it.
Synonym(s): eponymic (2) .
[G. epōnymos, named after]

eponym

A name of a disease, syndrome, anatomical part, surgical instrument, etc derived from the name of the person who discovered, invented or first successfully promulgated it.

eponym

a name or phrase formed from or including a person's name, e.g. Theiler's disease, Cowper's gland, Aschheim-Zondek test.
References in periodicals archive ?
His near contemporary, al-Juwayni, believed that early school authorities such as the disciples of the eponyms occupied a higher status than later jurists, but he never used the term intra-school (ijtihad fi l-madhhab) to refer to them, which suggests that the notion had not yet been settled.
It is a fact that every change initially generates a certain amount of resistance, especially with doctors and surgeons rooted in a culture in the management of a particular language loaded with eponyms with the risk of intoxicating themselves with this inappropriate symbolism that rather approaching the truth (15).
In the preface, the editors write, "[W]e fancy that we have listed most of the economic eponyms, and also some non-economic, albeit used in our profession.
He makes the same assumptions--that the eponyms served a one-year term and that all Rhodian eponyms are probably known--and he too counts back from a fixed point.
Whonamedit biographical dictionary of medical eponyms, http://www.
Their classification schemes are very puzzling, riddled with eponyms .
Now a new book, the Chambers Dictionary of Eponyms has provided a fascinating guide to the men , women, animals and gods who have contributed their names to the English language.
What about eponyms, words derived from people's names?
It is probably fair to say that in many a family business, the eponyms are habitually seen by their colleagues as "good chaps".
soft), location (where it's loudest), radiation (from the source), effect of maneuvers, and eponyms (not used much in pediatrics).
The eponyms are Coloureds -- that is, mixed Black and White -- and Lena debuts as a sort of Lucky to Boesman's dual Vladimir-Estragon: she's doubly dominated by someone who is semidominated.