epiphyte

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epiphyte

a plant such as some mosses and some orchids, that grows attached to another and uses it solely for purposes of support, doing it no harm, there being no parasitic association.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Disjunctions between eastern Brazil and the western Amazon are known for other vascular plants, for example in epiphytes (Freitas et al.
The amount of epiphytes was calculated for the mass unit of the dried and weighed host plant.
Following independent variables were entered: diameter of tree trunk at breast height (DBH), tree height, relative height of the lowest branch, total number of holes (both on trunk and in the crown), and total number of epiphytes (both on trunk and in the crown) (see supplementary Table S4, available online at http://dx.doi.org/10.1636/JoA-S-16-033.S4).
In addition to the trees, there are abundant lianas and epiphytes, clusters of hanging soil and litter, and even a multitude of microvagos with a rich and specific microworld.
Make sure they leave them in clear pot, as orchids are also epiphytes and their roots (which are green) need access to light to survive.
Tapinoma litorale Wheeler (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) is a small, inconspicuous New World ant that nests in plant cavities, particularly in epiphytes and hollow grass stems and twigs.
His international merits include prizes from nine international composition competitions, including first prize in the US for Dance of the Epiphytes in 2013 and in Italy for Light up the Sky!
Our oak is a miniecosystem in itself, covered in epiphytes (plants that grow on other plants) and rare lichen - home to the uncommon inquisitor beetle.
Although most leaf litter in a forest falls directly to the soil, a part of it is intercepted by tree canopies, shrubs (Lodge, 1996), understory plants (Alvarez-Sanchez and Guevara, 1999), and vascular epiphytes such as bromeliads (Lodge, 1996).