epidemic

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epidemic

 [ep″ĭ-dem´ik]
occuring suddenly in numbers clearly in excess of normal expectancy, in contrast to endemic or sporadic. The term is used especially of infectious diseases but is also applied to any disease, injury, or other health-related event occurring in such outbreaks.
epidemic hemorrhagic fever an acute infectious disease thought to be transmitted to humans by mites or chiggers; characteristics include fever, purpura, peripheral vascular collapse, and acute renal failure.

ep·i·dem·ic

(ep'i-dem'ik),
The occurrence in a community or region of cases of an illness, specific health-related behavior, or other health-related events clearly in excess of normal expectancy; the word is also used to describe outbreaks of disease in animals or plants. Compare: endemic, sporadic.
[epi- + G. dēmos, the people]

epidemic

(ĕp′ĭ-dĕm′ĭk) also

epidemical

(-ĭ-kəl)
adj.
1. Spreading rapidly and extensively by infection and affecting many individuals in an area or a population at the same time: an epidemic outbreak of influenza.
2. Widely prevalent: epidemic discontent.
n.
1. An outbreak of a contagious disease that spreads rapidly and widely.
2. A rapid spread, growth, or development: an unemployment epidemic.

ep′i·dem′i·cal·ly adv.

epidemic

adjective Referring to an epidemic noun The occurrence of more cases of a disease or illness than expected in a given community or region or among a specific group of people over a particular period of time; a wave of infections in a region by an organism with a short generation time; epidemics are usually heralded by an exponential rise in number of cases in time and a decline as susceptible persons are exhausted. See Hidden epidemic, Media epidemic, Pseudoepidemic, Tobacco epidemic. Cf Endemic, Pandemic.

ep·i·dem·ic

(ep'i-dem'ik)
The occurrence in a community or region of cases of an illness, specific health-related behavior, or other health-related events clearly in excess of normal expectancy.
Compare: endemic, sporadic
[epi- + G. dēmos, the people]

epidemic

The occurrence of a large number of cases of a particular disease in a given population within a period of a few weeks. Epidemics occur when a population contains many susceptible people. This is why epidemics often occur at intervals of several years.

epidemic

the occurrence of many cases of a disease within an area.

Epidemic

A situation where a large number of infections by a particular agent, such as a virus, develops in a short time. The agent is rapidly transmitted to many individuals.

ep·i·dem·ic

(ep'i-dem'ik)
Occurrence in a community or region of cases of an illness, specific health-related behavior, or other health-related events clearly in excess of normal expectancy.
[epi- + G. dēmos, the people]
References in periodicals archive ?
Unfortunately, many physicians, nurses, and hospital personnel were hostile and judgmental during the early stages of the epidemic. It was difficult to find consultants who would assist in the care of my patients.
One human epidemic began in December 2002 and the other in November 2003.
Pandemic Ends -- Successive pandemic waves cease and the traditional seasonal epidemic pattern returns.
A paediatrician at Auckland's Starship Hospital and associate professor at the University of Auckland, Cameron Grant, says the rates have been rising over the past 30 years and the coining epidemic was expected to be a big one.
Moreover, modern plague is seasonal, its climatic regularities indicating an insect (flea) vector, but late medieval epidemics could occur at any time and persist throughout the year despite wide fluctuations in temperature and humidity.
53); and an infected arriving human could not have been the origin of the West Nile epidemic in Queens, New York (p.
Watts, Epidemics and History: Disease, Power and Imperialism (New Haven, 1997), xii, 169, 173, 198, 216.
The Few is made up of three types of people--Connectors, Mavens and Salesmen--and each group in its own right is critical to social epidemics. Connectors are the kinds of people who know everyone, Gladwell notes.
Many bathhouses were shut down at the time in an effort to contain the epidemic. But while the number of bathhouses is lower now than in the 1980s, most major U.S.
For an in-depth look at a world epidemic much worse than many people thought even recently see the UNAIDS Report on the Global HIV/AIDS Epidemic, July 2002.
Scientists attribute the epidemic not only to the mismanagement of forests, where crowded trees compete for light and nutrients, weakening their defenses against insects, but also to global warming.