enucleation


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Related to enucleation: marsupialization

enucleation

 [e-noo″kle-a´shun]
removal of an organ or other mass intact from its supporting tissues, as of the eyeball from the orbit.

e·nu·cle·a·tion

(ē-nū'klē-ā'shŭn),
1. Removal of an entire structure (such as an eyeball or tumor), without rupture, as one shells the kernel of a nut.
2. Removal or destruction of the nucleus of a cell.
[L. enucleo, to remove the kernel, fr. e, out, + nucleus, nut, kernel]

enucleation

/enu·cle·a·tion/ (e-noo″kle-a´shun) removal of an organ or other mass intact from its supporting tissues, as of the eyeball from the orbit.

enucleation

[ino̅o̅′klē·ā′shən]
Etymology: L, e, without, nucleus, nut
1 removal of an organ or tumor in one piece.
2 removal of the entire eyeball, performed for malignancy, severe infection, extensive trauma, or control of pain in glaucoma. Local or general anesthesia is used. The optic nerve and muscle attachments are cut; if possible, the surrounding layer of fascia is left with the muscles. A round implant of hydroxyapatite (coralline or syntetic) is inserted, and the muscles are sutured around it, providing a permanent stump to give support and motion to an artificial eye, or an implant of porous polyethylene is inserted, allowing the rectus muscle to be sutured directly to the implant. After surgery, pressure dressings are kept in place for 1 or 2 days to prevent hemorrhage. Other possible complications include thrombosis of nearby blood vessels, which may lead to infection, including meningitis.
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Enucleation

e·nu·cle·a·tion

(ē-nū'klē-ā'shŭn)
1. Removal of an entire structure without rupture, as one shells the kernel of a nut.
2. Removal or destruction of the nucleus of a cell.
[L. enucleo, to remove the kernel, fr. e, out, + nucleus, nut, kernel]

enucleation

Removal from an enveloping capsule, sac or cover. The term is often used for the operation to remove an eyeball.

Enucleation

Surgical removal of the eyeball.
Mentioned in: Eye Cancer, Retinoblastoma

enucleation

removal of clavus/corn from surrounding skin without need for skin incision

enucleation

Removal of an eye from its socket. It is usually performed to reduce pain in a blind eye, when there is a risk of sympathetic ophthalmia following trauma, or when there is a malignant tumour in the eye. Immediately following the operation a spherical implant (made up of hydroxyapatite, polyethylene, or silicone rubber) is placed into the eye socket to be replaced several weeks later by an artificial eye. See evisceration; artificial eye.

enucleation

removal of an organ or other mass intact from its supporting tissues, as of the eyeball from the orbit.

lateral subconjunctival enucleation
involves a lateral canthotomy and a subconjunctival approach to the globe, extraocular muscles and optic nerve.
transpalpebral enucleation
removal of eyelids, conjunctiva and extraocular muscles along with eyeball.
References in periodicals archive ?
Following enucleation, oocytes were used as nuclear recipients for SCNT together with donor cumulus cells.
Evaluation of efficacy and complications: primary pediatric orbital implants after enucleation.
Episcleral brachytherapy plaques and heavy particle beam radiation have played a major role in reducing the need for enucleation.
First, the squish enucleation method--the only method that has successfully produced cloned human blastocysts and cloned nonhuman primate embryos--apparently does not overcome the biological barriers to further embryonic development caused by meiotic spindle removal.
In addition, because caspases are also activated during erythroid maturation and enucleation (9), assays detecting such activity will not serve to distinguish between apoptosis and differentiation.
Finally these prostheses were implanted to five anophthalmic human patients after enucleation / evisceration operation and post-operative studies are being continued.
Sixty patients will be randomized to holmium laser enucleation of the prostate or transurethral resection, for prostates with transrectal ultrasound volumes between 40 and 200 gins.
We describe our experience with focal laser photocoagulation and cryotherapy after chemotherapy to avoid enucleation or EBRT.
consumable material for the treatment through enucleation of benign prostatic hyperplasia and urinary lithiasis, consisting of three sublots with the estimated units of consumption and maximum unit bid prices, as detailed below: sublot 1.
Surgery was performed in 45/46 patients; 21 patients underwent enucleation (the most common procedure), nine patients were wedge resection, and 15 patients were lobectomy.
None of the patients treated for Coats' disease required enucleation during follow-up.
Irreparable injuries of eye or severe orbital and eye ball injuries, neoplastic growth in small ruminants need enucleation or extirpation of eye along with tarsorrhaphy depending upon the nature of malady and surgeon's choice (Tyagi and Singh, 2010).