entorhinal cortex

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entorhinal cortex

The inner gyrus of the temporal lobe of the brain. It comprises the parahippocampal gyrus and the subicular cortex. In the entorhinal cortex, the five-layer structure of the ventral temporal cortex gradually merges into the single layer that is found in the dentate gyrus, the innermost edge of the temporal lobe. The entorhinal cortex receives signals from and projects back to the frontal cortex, the insula, and the cingulate cortex, and it is the key brain region funneling input to the hippocampus.
See also: cortex
References in periodicals archive ?
The new research published in the journal 'Cell Reports' titled 'The Generation of Time in the Hippocampal Memory System' builds on the discovery by Nobel prize winners May-Britt and Edvard Moser that an input region to the hippocampus - the lateral entorhinal cortex (LEC) - has time ramping cells that slowly change their rates of activity over hundreds of seconds; and on the discovery that hippocampal time cells fire at separate times in a sequence.
Both are located in roughly the center of the brain, near other regions of the brain involved with memory, such as the entorhinal cortex and the amygdala.
A key component of this internal satnav is a region of the brain known as the entorhinal cortex.
At present, it is considered that the medial temporal lobe (including the entorhinal cortex, the side olfactory cortex, the side hippocampal cortex, and the hippocampus), the prefrontal lobe, and the precuneus are important areas related to episodic memory (12).
ZFP-TF treatment resulted in more than 80% lowering of tau in the hippocampus and entorhinal cortex, and transgene expression levels were strongly correlated with tau reduction.
In slices from the hippocampal and entorhinal cortex, the application of non-specific inhibitors of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) or a selective neuronal NOS prevented low [Mg.sup.++]-induced epileptic activity.
Secondary outcomes were the Clinical Dementia Rating Scale sum of boxes (CDR-sb) a memory composite measure, activities of daily living, cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers, and MRI of the hippocampus and entorhinal cortex.
By examining mouse brains' medial entorhinal cortex, researchers discovered neurons that turn on like a clock when they wait.
Scientists have recently identified a tiny area of the brain called the entorhinal cortex that is the hub for navigation control, and it seems to be the first part of the brain affected by Alzheimer's.
Place cells in the hippocampus and grid cells in the neighboring entorhinal cortex form a circuit that allows orientation and navigation.
For many years, memory loss was treated as a singular disorder, but now scientists realized that Alzheimer's disease begins in a part of the brain called the entorhinal cortex, which lies at the foot of the hippocampus while the age-related memory loss, a far more common memory disorder, began within the hippocampus itself, in a region called the dentate gyrus.
Participants were evaluated using a variety of biomarkers, including cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) amyloid-[beta] and phosphorylated-tau, MRI measures (hippocampal and entorhinal cortex volume), cognitive test scores and APOE genotype.